Displaying items by tag: Versace

Tuesday, 09 February 2021 12:27

Versace EROS Eau de Parfum

versace men's fragrance eros eau de parfum“I envisioned a heroic, passionate man, almost a Greek god. The fragrance is made up of notes that express sensuality and power, an extreme force”Donatella Versace

Versace's Eros fragrance, launched in 2013, gets an Eau de Parfum upgrade. The woody, oriental has a new chapter, revealed in the depth of its woody accord, cedar - vetiver - patchouli, rekindled by the radiant, energetic light of the quintessentially Italian lemon and mandarin and enlivened by a unique note of candied apple. Decadent vanilla dares to flirt with leather in the final note.

The campaign was shot in London by photographers Mert & Marcus, under the creative direction of Donatella Versace. The protagonist is the American model Brian Shimansky.

versace men's fragrance eros eau de parfum

Left - Eros Eau de Parfum is available exclusively at Boots nationwide - 100ml - £85

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versace men's fragrance eros eau de parfum

Published in News
Tuesday, 01 December 2020 16:30

ChicGeek Comment Lockdown Sizing

lockdown sizing in fragrance moschinoThere was a time when the sizing of perfume and fragrance couldn’t get any bigger. Brands and designers were piling into flacons of 200ml and upwards, trying to squeeze as much money as possible out of consumers for their hit ‘juices’. Two hundred millilitres is more conducive to the drinks cabinet than the bathroom.  Then came lockdowns.

Left - Brands such as Versace and Moschino are producing 'lockdown sizes' of 10ml fragrances for £20

A McKinsey report in May, 2020, said, with regards to the global beauty market, “2020 will be one of the worst years it has ever endured.” The report said consumer retail spending on beauty products was experiencing a sharp decline (up to 20%) as well, leading to an unprecedented projected $175 billion USD loss in revenue for the industry this year. 90% of women stated, in the report, they used little to no makeup while working from home.

It said, in May, “based on the scenarios most expected by global executives and current trends, we estimate global beauty-industry revenues could fall 20 to 30 percent in 2020. In the United States, if there is a COVID-19 recurrence later in the year, the decline could be as much as 35 percent.”

Unilever too has reported declining revenues in its personal care division. An update in April warned about shrinking personal care sales because more people working from home meant they were washing their hair less often, putting off shaving and even ditching deodorant. Four months on, in its Q3 report, it said personal care sales had continued to slump.

Graham Pitkethly, Unilever’s chief financial officer, said "fewer personal care occasions from going to work or socialising” impacted sales. Skincare declined high-single digit and deodorants declined low-single digit. Though there was a slowing of declines when we came out of lockdown during the summer.

The greedy fragrance industry has been built upon a biggest is best attitude when it comes to their products, and especially gifting, when, in fact, a little should go a long way. Brands have realised that demand has changed and are now launching smaller sizes in 10ml or 20ml editions. Moschino and Versace has 10ml options in many of their fragrances including ‘Toy Boy’, ’Dylan Blue’ and ‘Eros’ for £20. Eight & Bob has added a range with a 30ml (with optional artisan leather case), a size which isn’t often seen in bridge/niche brands. Much of this sizing was ironically called ‘Travel Size’ when, in fact, it’s the lack of travel and leaving the house which is creating the demand. Tocca has a ‘Travel Trio Set’ containing three 20ml bottles, while Goutal Paris is offering a ‘discovery set’ containing four classic 10ml fragrances from their range.

Sarah Binns, Head of Training at KGA, one of the UK & Ireland’s leading fragrance distributors, currently representing over 25 premium perfume brands, says, “Ironically I saw this ‘travel size’ trend start pre COVID-19 in response to the always on the go lifestyle and as a way to entice younger consumers into the category with a lower price point on luxury brands. Retailers had started requesting smaller sizes in fragrances to showcase in their pick ’n’ mix style locations near till points. It is interesting to see how this new size category has become so valuable in the current climate too.” she says.

“I think a lot of brands had started to develop these sizes pre lockdown for other reasons, but they have really come into their own with the current situation. Brands are aware that consumers are nervous to spend on something they can’t try first so this is a great solution.” says Binns.

The McKinsey report said, in most major beauty-industry markets, in-store shopping accounted for up to 85 percent of beauty-product purchases prior to the COVID-19 crisis, with some variation by subcategory. Even online-savvy American millennials and Gen Zers (those born between 1980 and 1996) made close to 60% of their purchases in stores. With the closure of premium beauty-product outlets because of COVID-19, approximately 30 percent of the beauty-industry market was shut down. Some of these stores will never open again, and new openings will likely be delayed for at least a year.

lockdown sizing in fragrance goutal paris

Suzy Nightingale, Senior Writer at The Perfume Society says, “We’re definitely seeing more fragrances offered in smaller ‘try me’ sizes, and although beauty products have been used less in lockdown; we’ve actually seen a huge rise in sales of our discovery boxes and brand sets, which offer sample vials, miniature bottles and travel sizes to try at home. Classic scents have even made a comeback as people reach for a familiar fragrances as a comfort blanket, reminding them of happier times.” she says.

Right - Goutal Paris 4 x 10ml fragrance sizes exclusively available at John Lewis: www.johnlewis.com - £68

“I think there’s been a desperate longing for ‘newness’, and we’ve also had fragrance lovers tell us they don’t want to associate this year with a single scent.” says Nightingale. “Simultaneously, many fragrance houses suddenly realised that, if people can’t get to shops or, when they do, tester bottles aren’t readily available anymore. This fast-tracked something we’ve all been asking for anyway: smaller size bottles we can try before we buy, or use to explore a diversity of scents or fragrance notes out of our usual comfort zones. 

“I definitely see this trend continuing - online previously had the hurdle of being a difficult place to buy your first full-size bottle of perfume if you’d not smelled it already. Nowadays, people want greater choice and the chance to flirt with lots of fragrances. Sometimes more IS more, but it doesn’t always mean a bigger bottle…” she says.

While the term ‘lockdown sizing’ won’t be used by the brands, it’s an interesting twist on the entry ‘travel size’ offer. These prices are keener and entice people to buy before they try. This is the beauty industry's version of a micro-bag; an entry level product aimed at younger and less affluent consumers. 

“Smaller sizes bring accessibility, the signature scent is becoming a thing of the past and it is much easier to build a large fragrance collection with these entry price options. In an environment when you often can’t test the product before you purchase, it’s a smaller risk to invest in a mini size first.” says Binns.

“I think this trend will continue within the COVID-19 environment as a way to experience new products before making a larger investment in the full size. Once we are able to travel again I’m sure that they will become even more popular for their portability.” she says.

How many people are wearing fragrance at home, or, at least, in the quantity they used to without social engagements and interaction with other people or work colleagues? The cheaper prices are also a factor in their popularity. When fully branded and looking as good as the full size bottles, rather than a simple tester, these items look much more desirable.

“Consumer confidence is low and this always has an effect on spending within beauty. People are reaching for products that make them feel good as oppose to looking or smelling good for other’s benefit. Fragrance sales were hit hard at the beginning of the pandemic but we have seen a steady increase as people rediscover the joy of treating themselves or showing love to others with a gift that encourages wellbeing” says Binns.

Sales in smaller sizes are better than no sales at all for the beauty industry, and the margins will be higher. The fragrance industry will hope these smaller lockdown sizes will encourage and continue the habit of individuals wearing fragrance even if we continue to be on our own.

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Published in Comment
Friday, 20 March 2020 17:48

Splash or Cash? The Greek Key Underpants

Versace greek key underwear black gold pantsVersace underwear, thanks to its signature use of the ancient Greek key design, has become one of the most recognisable brands across social media and in other images.

A little light history if you will. This decorative border is also called a meander or meandros. It recalls the twisting and turning path of the Maeander River in southwestern Turkey and is the labyrinth in linear form. It is thought to symbolise infinity and unity.

These, let’s call it an ‘homage’, from River Island, could fool even the biggest designer underwear fan. While the Versace Medusa head has been replaced by a bee - clearly these will be popular in Manchester - the rest looks almost identical and nobody on Instagram would ever know!

Versace greek key underwear black gold pants

Left - River Island - Black Printed Waistband Briefs 3 Pack - £15

Right - Versace - Logo Low-Rise Stretch-Cotton Briefs - £45 from matchesfashion.com

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Published in Fashion
Tuesday, 18 February 2020 10:10

ChicGeek Comment The Coronavirus COVID-19 Effect

Coronavirus covid 19 effect on luxury brands fendi maskWhen China sneezes, the world catches a cold. So, when China caught the new coronavirus, or COVID-19 virus, there was going to be major economic repercussions. With the world’s second largest economy on virtual lockdown, its effect on both domestic and international sales for fashion companies will be seismic.

While there is no way to predict how long it will take to runs its course, companies have already started to make tentative statements about how it is affecting their bottom line. Those companies heavily reliant on the Chinese market and high spending Chinese tourists will be particularly affected and be crossing their fingers that this is over quickly.

Left - Fendi - FF Silk Face Mask - £170 from Luisa Via Roma 

While it is hard to predict the length of the outbreak and its impact, we can look back at the last major virus outbreak, SARS, which originated in China in 2002. It's thought that this strain of the coronavirus usually only found in small mammals mutated, enabling it to infect humans in the same way as COVID-19 has. By the end of the nine-month long SARS outbreak, the virus had spread to several other Asian countries as well as the UK and Canada, killing 775 and infecting more than 8,000 people.

The current stats for COVID-19 are 71,499 confirmed cases and 1,776 deaths, that’s a 1 in 40 death rate compared to over 1 in 10 for SARS. In terms of stats it looks less serious, with many people being carriers and displaying no symptoms. The under reporting of Chinese authorities has been questioned and how they are trying to minimise the severity of the outbreak, but they seem to be taking swift action to prevent contagion. 

The world in 2020 is very different from 2002. The Chinese are travelling much more and have become some of the world’s highest spending tourists. In 2005, there were 95,000 Chinese visitors to the UK, in 2018 that number had reached 391,000 and was continuing to grow. Chinese tourists make up the largest share of visitors to the UK (32%) and they have one of the highest average spends of any national group. In 2018, the latest set of statistics, the average spend of a Chinese tourist in the UK amounted to £1,373. They were only surpassed by visitors from Qatar and UAE.

In London’s West End, accounting for a quarter of all non-EU tax-free spend in 2018, on average, Chinese customers spent £1,630 per shopping trip, making them 59% more valuable than other international shoppers.

Hong Kong-based airline, Cathay Pacific, has already cut 90% of its capacity into mainland China and announced that overall capacity would be slashed by 30% as a result of falling demand related to the outbreak. British Airways announced that it would temporarily suspend its flights to mainland China, following the UK Foreign Office’s advice against all but essential travel to the country.

The most visited country in Europe was France with 2.2 million Chinese nationals visiting in 2018. Paris was already having to contend with transport strikes and gilet jaunes protests and now one of its most valuable visitors is staying away. The same could be said about Hong Kong; months of riots now followed by COVID-19 will have taken its toll on this important luxury retail location. The majority of the world’s major cities will be affected by the lack of Chinese tourists.

For British luxury giant, Burberry, Chinese consumers account for 40 per cent of revenues worldwide. Burberry Group plc released a statement at the beginning of February saying, “The outbreak of the coronavirus in Mainland China is having a material negative effect on luxury demand. While we cannot currently predict how long this situation will last, we remain confident in our strategy.” said Marco Gobbetti, Chief Executive Officer.

Currently 24 of Burberry’s 64 stores in Mainland China are closed with remaining stores operating with reduced hours and seeing significant footfall declines. This is impacting retail sales in both Mainland China and Hong Kong “The spending patterns of Chinese customers in Europe and other tourist destinations have been less impacted to date but given widening travel restrictions, we anticipate these to worsen over the coming weeks.” the statement said. Burberry was planning to hold a fashion show in Shanghai in March but that has been put on indefinite hold, while Chanel has cancelled its May Métiers d’Art show scheduled for Beijing. 

Coronavirus covid 19 effect on luxury brands off white mask

Estée Lauder gave a recent update to the markets saying it it expects adjusted earnings of $5.60 to $5.70 per share in 2020, down from a previous estimate of $5.85 to $5.93 citing the coronavirus. Fabrizo Freda, Estee Lauder president and chief executive, said: “The global situation will also affect our financial results in the near term, so we are updating our fiscal year outlook. We will be ready to return to our growth momentum as the global coronavirus is resolved.”

Other brands who have focussed on growth in China will feel the effects. Luxury outerwear brand, Moncler, warned that footfall at its stores in China had plunged 80% since the coronavirus outbreak and it earns 43% of its total revenues from Asia. Michael Kors and Versace owner Capri Holdings saying it would take a $100m hit from coronavirus in China, where it was forced to close more than 150 stores.

Right - Off-White - Logo Print Face Mask - £65 from Farfetch

Kering makes 34% of its sales in Asia Pacific, excluding Japan. Kering’s chief executive officer, François-Henri Pinault, said - on the 12th February - the group - Gucci, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Bottega Veneta - had experienced a strong drop in sales over the past 10 days. Many of the group’s stores in China are closed or running reduced hours. The company said it will halt advertising spend and postpone new openings in China in the near-term in a bid to limit the damage caused by the virus. Pinault said that planned product launches might also be reconsidered and is also shifting inventory to other regions to make sure stocks don't pile up in China. Without giving an estimate for any impact from the virus on earnings, he said online shopping was not really making up for the decline in store footfall. "The warehouses are shut. People can place orders but there are no deliveries," he said.

While being strong in China and in the Chinese market has been a boon for many years, this outbreak shows the danger of having all your eggs in the Chinese basket. Once a high growth area, this is a double whammy for brands; you have the domestic market closed and the free spending tourists are no longer shopping. 

China’s growth was already slowing, but it was just about to come out of the trade wars with America. Even if this outbreak is over in a relatively short window of time, it’s the momentum it has lost that will take the longest time to get back. Getting those Chinese tourists to rebook their flights and travel plans, brands reworking expansion plans and product and consumers getting that feel good factor to spend will take months to correct. Many brands are downplaying the current impact to protect their share price. Hopefully, the epidemic will be over shortly, but the repercussions of COVID-19 will be felt by the fashion industry well into 2020.

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Published in Fashion
Tuesday, 25 September 2018 13:41

ChicGeek Comment Versace to Kors

Versace bought by Michael KorsVersace is a trophy brand and I can imagine many a green eye coming from the offices of LVMH, Kering and other fashion conglomerates asking why they hadn’t claimed this prize themselves. While the price isn’t a snip - approximately US$2.12 billion - and nobody knows the details of Donatella’s contract - it would have be something special in order to entice her to sell the family’s 80% stake - it is one of the few brands which resonates on to the lips and minds of everyday consumers. This happens for very few brands and is very hard to achieve.

Left - In Donatella's image? Versace advertising

Versace has a strong identity and tropes which are continually referenced - you only have to look at the continual ‘baroque’ collections from ASOS, Boohoo and River Island to see that - yet it never seems to fully capitalise on them itself. It can’t turn that into money. The profits are small - 15 million euro in 2017 - and it was always a brand which seemed to play musical chairs with its store portfolio; continually opening and closing stores.

On the other hand, Michael Kors is a well run accessorises company. The minute they knew their mid-market brand had peaked, and their market was saturated, they started closing stores -  between 100 and 125 over two years. They knew the landscape changed, the brand was fatigued, and you need to make hay while the sun shines, which they’ve done. It’s knowing when to start putting your money into new areas and elevating. Everything is about ‘elevating’ ATM!

The confidence of buying Jimmy Choo, and that seems to be doing well, has maintained the momentum of this spending spree. While not likely partners, many groups have disparate brands and, if Michael Kors knows one thing, it’s how to grow.

John D. Idol, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Michael Kors Holdings Limited, said, “With the full resources of our group, we believe that Versace will grow to over US$2.0 billion in revenues (from 668 million euro currently). We believe that the strength of the Michael Kors and Jimmy Choo brands, and the acquisition of Versace, position us to deliver multiple years of revenue and earnings growth.”

“Donatella’s iconic style is at the heart of the design aesthetic of Versace. She will continue to lead the company’s creative vision.” he says.

Versace bought by Michael Kors

It’s interesting to remember LVMH used to own a third of Michael Kors before he went for the masstige market and the company blew up and he was also the Creative Director of the LVMH owned Celine in the late 1990s.

The new group will be called ‘Capri Holdings Limited’. (Didn’t Michael Kors once do a mink beach towel with ‘CAPRI’ on it?) The new group says there is an opportunity to grow the group’s revenues to US$8.0 billion in the long-term, which would make it one of the largest fashion companies.

Right - Vintage Versace advertising - Gianni Versace is forever associated with the Supermodels

Donatella Versace says, “Santo (brother), Allegra (daughter) and I will become shareholders in Capri Holdings Limited. This demonstrates our belief in the long-term success of Versace and commitment to this new global fashion luxury group.”

Michael Kors’ expertise is accessorises. They say they want to expand Versace men’s and women’s accessories and footwear from 35% to 60% of revenues. Versace has never really resonated in these areas, often looking more tacky than desirable. Jimmy Choo will also offer synergies in luxury footwear and bags.

There’s also going to be a filip back to dressing up at some point and Versace is well placed, particularly in a sexually charged, Italian way.

As for more affordable products, they could expand underwear, home, sunglasses and perfume. The perfumes, since the very beginning, have never matched the quality and branding of the rest of the brand. Versace needs to choose areas and do them well, rather than the light licensing it has often achieved since its inception in 1978. Versace was one of those brands that had such disparate product - from cheap looking tins of perfume to the most luxurious Italian printed silk.

Capri Holdings say they want to “build on Versace’s luxury runway momentum”, - *books Supermodels* - and want to be less reliant on its home market of the US, grow in Asia and become more global.

Versace must have had numerous takeover offers through the years and it would be interesting to know the reasons of, why now? Why Michael Kors? The brand is 40 this year, so maybe the family want to fully maximise its potential, maybe it was pressure from the private equity investors to get out, or maybe it’s the realisation that you have to turn into a billion dollar brand to survive. Grow or die.

Below - The Versace ladies by Steven Meisel 

Versace bought by Michael Kors

Published in Fashion
Thursday, 28 June 2018 15:12

SS19 Menswear Milan/Paris Trends Scrapbook

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Prada

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Dior Homme

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Fendi

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Hermes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear SS World Corp

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Maison Margiela

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Jacquemus

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Prada

Male Daisy Dukes

Putting the duke into Daisy Duke, okay, so they're usually denim, but these shorts are seriously short.

Top Left - Prada, Dior Homme, Fendi, Hermès

From Left - SS World Corp, Maison Margiela, Jacquemus, Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Prada Denim

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Alyx Denim

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Balmain Denim

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear CMMN SWDN Denim

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Off White Denim

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Valentino DenimSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Versace Denim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Bad Denim

Is there any other type of denim these days? It keeps on getting worse and it ain't going away.

Above - Prada, Alyx, Balmain, CMMN SWDN, Off-White

Left - Valentino, Versace

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Summer Roll Necks Prada

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Summer Roll Necks Prada

Summer Roll-Neck

Burnt neck? Don’t worry the summer roll-neck's got you. These were made for a British summer.

Left - Both - Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Summer Dries van Noten brown

Brown Art Suit

I just love this. Simples.

Left - Dries van Noten

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Summer 1960s Prada

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear SS19 Raf Simons Verner Panton

'60s shapes

Verner Panton was the inspiration at Dries (left) and this carried over to Prada and Raf. 

Left - Prada, Raf Simons

Long Cuffs

If you've seen more untucking than Rupaul's Drag Race, it's now time to let those French cuffs hangout. Goodbye cufflinks!

Below Both - Alexander McQueen

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Alexander McQueen

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Alexander McQueen

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Cape Alexander McQueenSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear CMMN SWDNSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Maison Margiela

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arm Caping

Caping was once massive eyeroll at fashion week, but, now, you can put your shoulders in!

From Left - Alexander McQueen, CMMN SWDN, Maison Margiela

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Raf SimonsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Raf Simons

The Scarf With Coat Attached

Trust Raf Simons do give us something we didn't know we needed. It won't blow away!

Below - Raf Simons, Raf Simons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Dries van Noten Green CoatSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Raf Simons Green Satin CoatSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des Garcons

Green Man

How many green coats do you own? Exactly. Nothing welcomes spring like the Green Man. May Day alert!

Left - Dries van Noten, Raf Simons, Comme des Garcons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Raf SimonsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Dolce & Gabbana Green ManSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Thom Browne Green Man

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow VersaceLeft - Dunhill, Dolce & Gabbana, Thom Browne, Versace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow Raf Simons

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow Dior Homme

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow Ermenegildo ZegnaYellow

Yellow hasn't mellowed, in fashion terms, it's just got brighter.

From Left - Raf Simons, Dior Homme, Ermenegildo Zegna

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow Raf Simons

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow Raf Simons

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow Jacquemus

Left - Hermès, Thom Browne, Jacquemus, Versace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Ami Baby Bucket HatSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Baby Bucket Hat FendiSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Bucket Hat Stella McCartney

Baby Bonnets

Don't be a dummy, get a bucket hat with the baby ties.

From Left - Ami, Fendi, Stella McCartney

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des Garcons

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des Garcons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Longer DB

This season saw the beginnings of something more grown-up and less novelty. It starts with the double-breasted, longer jacket.

Above From Left - Ami, Dior Homme, CMMN SWDN, Dunhill, Versace

Below - Left - Kenzo, Louis Vuitton, Paul Smith, Stella McCartney, Thom Browne

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des Garcons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear CMMN SWDN shiny shirtSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Yellow shirt WooyoungmiSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Dior Homme

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shiny Shirt

We've had latex and leather trousers, now, it's time for the shiny, plastic looking shirt.

From Left - CMMN SWDN, Wooyoungmi, Dior Homme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Maison Margiela Half HalfHalf & HalfSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Alexander McQueen

Yin & Yang your look. It's as clear as night and day.

From Left - Maison Margiela, Alexander McQueen

Deconstructed Army

You won't find this in any army surplus shop, but it makes you want to get in the big outdoors.

Below From Left - DSquared2, Neil Barrett

 

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear DSquared2 align=SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Neil Barrett Army

SS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Comme des GarconsSS19 Trends Short Shorts Menswear Versace Home Knits

Home Knits

Just say 'Auntie Donatella knitted it for me, daarling!'.

From Left - Valentino, Louis Vuitton, Versace

Published in Fashion

The real reason luxury fashion companies are no longer using real furThis article isn’t a discussion on the pros and cons of real fur and offers no moral viewpoint on its use. I acknowledge that this contentious issue/material is divisive and has passion on both sides. 

The real ‘fur’ industry has seen massive growth, since the beginning of this century, driven by international consumers and trims on accessories and coats. It is now a $40 billion industry. It was inevitable that it would have a backlash and there would be a reaction to it, most notably from younger consumers. 

I put ‘fur’ into speech marks because it’s a very broad term and while some brands may no longer use mink they continue to use the skins of other animals and there’s no definitive reason for the choice of some animals making the used list and not the others. Read more here - ChicGeek Comment Fur Debate: You Either Use Animals Or You Don’t

Brands such as Gucci, Versace and Martin Margiela have decided to announce they will no longer use real fur. Donatella Versace recently said, “Fur? I am out of that,” she said. “I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion. It doesn’t feel right.”

“Naturally we were disappointed to hear that Versace has said it won’t use real fur in collections. However, the majority of top designers will continue to work with fur as they know it is a natural product that is produced responsibly. When Donatella Versace says ‘I don’t want to kill animals to make fashion.’ presumably her company will soon stop using silk and leather?” says Andrea Martin from the British Fur Trade Association.

“It is disingenuous to claim that leather is a by-product of the meat industry, a cow still had to die to provide the product. Silk cocoons are placed in boiling water to help unravel the thread with the silk worm inside,” says Martin.

Italian accessories brand Furla has formally declared that it will be banning fur from its collections from November of this year, which would coincide with the launch of its Cruise ’19 collections. This follows decisions by Michael Kors and Yoox Net-A-Porter, which has declared that all its stores and websites would be real fur-free zones.

“I think some of the brands have gone fur free under pressure from anti-fur trends, and some are genuinely concerned. If brands don’t want to use animals for fashion then they need to consider leather, exotic skins, silk, sheepskin, makeup and products, all of which use animals. I also think human welfare is important to consider when producing fashion, and this often gets forgotten.” says Rebecca Bradley, a London based fur designer.

So, why are luxury brands really dropping the use of real fur? 

I think it is pure economics and the high margin greed of today’s luxury industry. It’s the same reason many restaurants are pushing vegetarian and vegan options: the margins are higher and therefore the profit. By charging slightly lower prices for something which is much cheaper to make, the margins increase. There are only so many €25,000 full-fur coats a brand will sell and the ceiling price is sensitive, so you can’t factor in the same margins you would on your other products. If you make it in faux-fur you'll get a higher margin and a bigger percentage of profit. You’ll also sell more and probably generate more money overall.

The irony is, the reason a real fur coat is so expensive is because of the high welfare standards of the European producers. Luxury brands wouldn’t be able to use cheaper real-fur from other sources witout criticism and scrutiny.

“Fur coats may seem expensive, however the price of a fur coat should reflect a high standard of animal welfare, and therefore with a beautiful, high quality fur, many skilled people are involved with production, including a furrier, and finisher to create a fur coat that will last for many generations, ” says Bradley.

Fur, for the majority of brands, is a very small part of their businesses and therefore it’s not difficult to heroically declare you’re no longer going to use it. It’s also easily replaced by a cheaper, synthetic alternative while not altering the price very much or at all. You can paint the use of a fake fur trim as an ethical choice rather than a cost saver to the consumer. It’s cynical I know, but it’s working.

PETA’s Director, Elisa Allen, says, “Fur is dead, dead, dead. As well as making sense for designers' conscience, ditching fur makes business sense, as today's consumers are demanding animal and eco-friendly clothing for which no animal has been electrocuted, strangled, or caught in a steel-jaw trap. From Armani to Versace, the list of fur-free designers is growing every day, and innovative vegan fashion is on the rise. The tide has turned irrevocably, and there's no going back.”

Many brands used the word ‘sustainable’ when announcing their decision to no longer use real-fur, but again, this is another term in fashion that is very broad and has little full meaning until you see the detail. I’m not sure a fake fur coat is particularly sustainable, but then again it does depend on the material.

But, you also have to acknowledge that nobody needs to wear a real fur coat. We could easily survive without real fur, but it’s interesting how, out of all the animal products we use, this is one of the most offensive to some and creates the biggest reactions and protests.

The real fur industry continues to grow in China and with other newly rich consumers and markets. It is now a US$17 billion-a-year industry in China and Haining, near Shanghai, is its hub.. Fur companies will be a bit like tobacco companies: the falling sales in established markets will be replaced by growing sales in new and even bigger markets in Asia.

Chinese animal welfare standards are very different from European standards. European producers have very strict regulations and it’s an industry which has to be transparent in order to ward off criticism.

“We respect the fashion industry’s attempts to become more responsible for the products they produce. Animal welfare is of critical importance and the fur produced is farmed to the highest welfare standards.” says Martin.

“With growing concern about the environment and plastics we believe it is more responsible to move back to the use of natural, biodegradable materials. Fur is the natural and responsible choice for designers and consumers.” says Martin.

Ditching fur is quite a lazy way for luxury brands to try to be more ‘sustainable’ and look like they care about the environment. 

“I think that companies and consumers becoming educated and aware of origins of products and materials is a fantastic thing, but the focus needs to be across the board, ensuring standards of human, or animal welfare and environmental impact.” says Bradley.

Many brands are seeing real fur as something they live without and it’s more hassle than it’s worth if the profit and quantities aren’t there. You can pick holes into both sides of the fur debate. While a positive move for many, the decision to no longer use real fur is really a cleverly spun business decision and driven by their continued obsession for huge margins.

Read more expert ChicGeek Comments - here

Published in Fashion
Tuesday, 20 March 2018 16:33

Menswear Trends AW18 Milan Chic Geek Scrapbook

Milan gave us handbags, more shiny coats and reasons to look like a tourist. Here goes AW18:

AW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi handbags

AW18 menswear trends Milan Palm Angels handbags

AW18 menswear trends Milan Pradai handbags

Handbags

Ooooo, look at you! Bags have been getting smaller, so we may as well call a spade a spade.

From Left - Fendi, Palm Angels, Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Milan Gucci Shiny coat

AW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi shiny coat

AW18 menswear trends Milan Prada shiny coatAW18 menswear trends Milan shiny coat versaceAW18 menswear trends Milan Moschino shiny coatAW18 menswear trends Milan Moschino shiny coat

Mr Sheen

The future is wipe clean and the quicker you get your head around this, the better.

From Left - Gucci, Fendi, Prada, Versace

Below - Both Moschino

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagonal Stripes

Like a walking 70s airline logo.

Below - Both Fendi

AW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi diagonal stripesAW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi shiny coat

 

AW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi distorted stripesAW18 menswear trends Milan Ermanno Scervino distorted stripesAW18 menswear trends Milan Marni distorted stripesAW18 menswear trends Milan Moschino distorted stripes

Distorted Stripes

This could be one of my favourite trends of the season. Not blurred lines, but distorted ones.

Above From Left - Fendi, Ermanno Scervino, Marni, Moschino

AW18 menswear trends Milan Gucci jacket open arms

Open Arms

The new caping.

Left - Gucci

Tourist

Nothing wrong with looking like a tourist in AW18. The worst the better. Just don't look up!

Below - Fendi, Prada, Prada

AW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi looking like a touristAW18 menswear trends Milan Prada looking like a touristAW18 menswear trends Milan Prada looking like a tourist

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Milan Fendi coatAW18 menswear trends Milan Gucci coatAW18 menswear trends Milan No.21 shiny coatAW18 menswear trends Milan Marni coatAW18 menswear trends Milan Marni blanket coat

Blanket Coat

Any blanket looking design cut into a coat or simply just thrown over your shoulders.

From Left - Fendi, Gucci, No.21, Marni

Below - Marni

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Go Wilde

What did Oscar say about resisting temptation? Dress like you haven't.

Below From Left - Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, Dolce & Gabbana

AW18 menswear trends Milan Oscar Wilde GucciAW18 menswear trends Milan Oscar Wilde Dolce GabbanaAW18 menswear trends Milan Oscar Wilde Dolce & Gabbana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Milan Prada shiny coatAW18 menswear trends Milan Prada badges coat

Badges

This is part normcore, part 80s, part 90s, part...

Both Prada

Coloured Lenses

Fear & Loathing lenses. I wore these all last Summer and they ain't going anywhere. 

Below Both - Dolce & Gabbana

AW18 menswear trends Milan colouredlenses Dolce & GabbanaAW18 menswear trends Milan colouredlenses Dolce & Gabbana 

Published in Fashion

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look Gianni Versace Assaination

The first episode of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story premiered last night, and, while we already who know whodunnit, we don’t know why? Will we ever know? Andrew Cunanan killed himself shortly afterwards.

Left - The Andrew Cunanan character in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

One of the highlight looks from the first episode was a Sara Lee yellow, full look of slouchy 80s-style trousers, polo shirt and matching cap. Yellow can frighten many guys and is therefore quite difficult to find in the shops. This is a softer, more pastel hue.

Right - All about Sara Lee yellow this Summer

Look at it like a dose of wardrobe vitamin D. Okay, so this did have the backdrop of Art Deco Miami, but just imagine the palm trees when you’re rolling down your local high-street with your jacket slung over your shoulder and your big serial killer shades on.

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story ASOS adidas

Left - adidas Originals - Trefoil Cap In Yellow - £15 from ASOS

Below - Don't want to be recognised? Go for serial killer sized shades

Andrew Cunanan Sunglasses Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime StoryBelow - Lacoste Live - Unisex Slim Fit Petit Piqué Polo - £85

Andrew Cunanan Sunglasses Yellow Get The Look Lacoste Polo Shirt The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left - Versace - Sunglasses - £96

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Left - DSquared2 - Light Yellow Suit - £521 from YOOX

See Get The Look - Call Me By Your Name

Get The Look - Wild, Wild Country

Published in Fashion
Wednesday, 13 December 2017 16:20

Must Have Men’s Accessory Medallion Man

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts luke day ben cobb

The silk pyjama shirt has become a fixture in our wardrobes - it was one of the most popular men’s items in the recent Erdem X H&M collaboration -  Read 'The Return of The Sexy Shirt' - and it was inevitable, in all its louche, open-shirtedness, that we needed something extra to decorate our chests with. Enter the medallion. 

Left - Fashion week street style

This look hasn’t been cool since the seventies with the combined stench of Brut aftershave and porn-star taches. But we're peacocking again and this overt masculinity is the reason why it is back. It’s very Burt Reynolds, very Magnum PI and has a musky, hirsute sexiness to it.

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts Alex Orso men's jewelleryRight - Alex Orso - Disc - Gold - £125

I’m loving a silk shirt ATM, see one of my favourites of the season here and you wear it open with confidence. It could be the “Call Me By Your Name” effect, where the medallion necklace is an important signifier within the film  - see more Call Me By Your Name style here or it's the effect of guys being more flamboyant and wearing printed silk shirts.

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts black dakini matchesfashionTeam with silk trousers and a smile. Have you got the swagger for a medallion?

Left - Black Dakini - Disk Pendant Sterling Silver Necklace - £355 from Matchesfashion.com

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts vintage versace

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts steve mcqueen

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts ryan gosling

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts asos gold st christopher

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts steve mcqueen

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts hairy chest magnum PI Tom Selleck

Below - Vintage Bruce Weber Versace 

Below Right - Steve McQueen

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts call me by your name star of david

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Far Left -Ryan Gosling

Middle - The medallion draws attention to your chest

Left - More McQueen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left - Tom Selleck being Tom Selleck

Below Left - Call Me By Your Name - the older character shows his influence on the younger one when he starts to copy him and wear the same necklace

Below - Chained & Able - St. Christopher - £22 from ASOS

You're going to need a silk shirt to go with this - see more here The Return of 'The Sexy Shirt'

 

men's medallion necklaces silk shirts asos gold

 

Published in The Fashion Archives
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