Designers at Debenham chop The Chic GeekYesterday, The Evening Standard reported the new chief executive of Debenhams, Sergio Bucher, is cutting back on some of the older fashion designers who have been selling ranges at the department store for decades as he tries to freshen up its cool credentials. 

About time. They desperately need a clear out. They haven’t named who is going yet, but they’ve already said they want to shift the focus of the stores away from fashion to more experiences like dining and beauty.

Left - Who is for the chop at Debenhams?

When ‘Designers at Debenhams’ started Debenhams was one of the first retailers on the British high-street to acknowledge and react to the growing demand from consumers for a ‘name’ on a product. It was a genius move at the time. After seeing their success, other retailers such as Marks & Spencer copied with Autograph, while, strangely, never put anybody’s name on it?!

That was 23 years ago and Debenhams hasn’t moved it on. They’ve stuck with the same crop of designers and 23 years in fashion is a couple of lifetimes, especially how fast it is today. The menswear, in particular, with the exception of Hammond & Co. hasn’t seen any new life or blood for years.

At past press days, where they preview their new collections, they’ve shown me 4 rails of men's clothes, all different ‘designers’, but all looking the same because they are designed by the same people.

Many of these designers have grown fat and lazy with Debenhams. Making millions while Debenhams has become a sea of grey, black and navy. While the men’s high-street has embraced so much over this time, Debenhams has stuck with an older customer who they disappointly underestimate with their product mix. A 45 year old man today is very different from the 45 year old man in 1993.

It has lost any form of excitement and point of difference. This seems an obvious and much needed step in the right direction. Department stores are looking old-fashioned at the moment: they have to make themselves relevant if they are to survive. You have to create newness all the time with the likes of John Lewis and Amazon biting at your heels.

Bucher will update on his strategic plan for Debenhams in April.

Tuesday, 13 December 2016 16:32

#OOTD 96 Chic Geek The Smart Tracksuit

Lyle Scott tracksuit navy The Chic GeekTom Ford, you’re missing out! Even after all his daily baths, you'd think it would be too tempting to slip a tracksuit on, but, he recently told GQ America that he didn’t own sweatpants, but he did concede that he’s a member of a tennis club in London that only permits its members to wear white, and yes, sometimes he does get into the car in this one pair of white sweatpants, since it’s required, but no one on the street sees him because his driver pulls him right up to the club.

Oh, the shame! Can you imagine?! Well, the tide has turned and boy, does TheChicGeek love a good tracksuit.

Credits - Tracksuit - Lyle & Scott, Watch - Mondaine, T-Shirt - Derek Rose, Trainers - Russell & Bromley

Shot by Robin Forster on Olympus PEN 

More images below

UK OOTD Blogger The Chic Geek TracksuitManspreading Geek Navy TracksuitThe Chic Geek Lyle & Scott sportswearnavy blue tracksuit sportswear geekThe Chic Geek styl icon menswear lyle scottsports casual chic geek navy tracksuit

The magazine vinyl revival resurgenceI have a theory about magazines.

I’m not anti-magazines or printed media just because I’m a blogger, but, the fact is people are buying fewer magazines and newspapers and the younger generation hasn’t grown up with the habit of paying money for magazines or printed media. 

Left ChicGeek Records - You spin me write round, baby, write round...

Many people, especially in the big cities, are happy with the free printed copies they are given. Publications have gone free to increase circulation and this impresses the advertisers, but anybody who has seen the piles of uncollected Evening Standards at the end of the day will realise that many of these numbers may not ring true.

Even some of the free ones, in a crowded market, are closing - see the men’s free magazine, Coach, which announced it was going online only last week.

People only have so much time and inclination to read something instead of draining their phone battery getting the same information the day before. What will happen to the numbers of copies picked up with increased wifi and internet speeds on public transport, I wonder? 

Anyway, records sales hit £2.5m last week compared with £2.1m for digital, with the surge partly attributed to Christmas gift buying. Vinyl has also experienced eight consecutive years of growth, despite almost dying out around 2006.

There are many reasons for this. People are streaming music and no longer downloading and the cost of vinyl is much higher than digital music. Also, the older generation who haven’t got used to storing music on computers and downloading, and have a high disposal income, have rediscovered their love of vinyl and have started buying again and not just old, classic albums. Comparing monetary sales skews the results. Obviously sales of digital music is higher in volume than vinyl, but, it’s still increasing and shows the power in nostalgia. 

It’s not all hipsters.

Anyway, back to my magazine theory. More glossy magazines are going fold and disappear and I think this is going to only speed up. Many publishers are merging editorial and advertorial teams to reduce costs, but they've been doing this for years and many are leaner than a butcher’s pencil with no fat left to trim. They've been too focused on the bottom line and not on delivering what people want. It's like they don't know what people want, anymore, and have become too advertiser facing.

The industry will hit its own 2006, like vinyl, and then they’ll be a niche revival of magazines and printed media featuring great photography and things you need to touch, feel and see in print. Much like vinyl, selling for £25 a time, we’ll be prepared to pay the going rate for a magazine, which is much more than what we’re paying for it now. What do you say?

The Risk of Trimming Pubes STI increasesFrom the metrosexual’s early foray into light trimming to the porn-star-bald-as-a-coot look of today, it turns out our love of messing with our pubes could actually be bad for us.

Shaving, trimming, or otherwise grooming pubic hair may be associated with an increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to a study of more than 7,500 American men and women, published in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Left - It seems it maybe better to be a cheeky monkey than as bald as a coot!

‘Extreme groomers’ - sounds like a Louis Theroux documentary - those who remove all their pubic hair at least 11 times a year are most at risk.

The study, although observational in nature, suggests a potential link between frequent, intense pubic hair grooming and increased exposure to a host of STIs.

“Such a relation is plausible because the act of grooming with razors or shavers causes epidermal microtears, which may permit epithelial penetrance by bacterial or viral STIs,” E. Charles Osterberg of the University of Texas and colleagues wrote in their study. 

“Irrespective of the underlying mechanism—whether a casual relation or statistical association—understanding the possible link between pubic hair grooming and STI acquisition could be useful for developing strategies to reduce STI rates.”

Osterberg and colleagues surveyed 7,580 men and women, 74 percent of whom reported at least some pubic hair grooming. The researchers found that groomers were often younger and more sexually active than non-groomers, and that  those ‘extreme groomers’ reported the greatest number of sexual partners.

The researchers concluded that any type of grooming is associated with an 80 percent increased risk of contracting any of eight STIs evaluated, including HIV, herpes, gonorrhea, and genital lice. 

Extreme grooming was associated with a 3.5- to four-fold increased risk, especially for cutaneous - relating to the skin - STIs, such as herpes and HPV.

Because of the study’s observational design, it is impossible to determine causation based on these results. And although the authors attempted to control for lifetime sexual partners and other confounding variables, it remains possible that pubic hair grooming is a marker not of increased STI risk, but of increased likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behaviors. “Several mechanisms may work together to explain our findings,” the authors wrote. “For instance, our stronger findings for cutaneous STIs may be explained by both microtears and residual confounding.”

There are a lot of variables here. The people who admitted to trimming their pubes were younger and more sexually active and the extreme groomers had the most sexual partners so increasing their risk. It could also be said that those in a monogamous relationship may not be as worried about being as tidy downstairs as those who are single and meeting more people more frequently. 

But, let’s be honest, trimming down there isn’t easy. No matter what you use, body groomer, razor, waxing etc., there is always a possibility of nicks and tears and it makes physical sense that this could make you more vulnerable of exposure to an STI. 

It’s funny how, over the last few years, guys became fixated on facial hair and growing it and downstairs went in the opposite direction. Looking at this study, there’s definitely an argument to being lazy. 

Monday, 05 December 2016 16:42

ChicGeek Comment Brands Need The 90s Back

1990s fashion revival backThe 90s are back!!!! I thought I’d get in there early before all the headlines, like these, hit the internet when Raf Simons shows his first collection for Calvin Klein in February. See more here

Left - Pulp - Something Changed!

Kurt Cobain fashion menswear revivalThe 90s revival has been bubbling along for a while now. It was inevitable, everything else has comeback, after all. Over the last few years we've seen a few grunge or washed denim throwbacks. Looking back, it was something of a golden era. Sandwiched between the fall of the Berlin Wall and 9/11, the 90s was a time of minimalism, Britpop and dance music. While it didn't feel particularly original, at the time, what with the large ‘Groove Is In The Heart’ 1970s revival and the return to live music, it still had enough original music and fashion to be distinctive when looking back retrospectively.

Right - Where did I leave my cardy? Kurt Cobain, the poster boy of American grunge

It was also the start of designer fashion as we know it today. This period of rapid expansion and no internet was a golden era of shopping centres and brands reaching their zenith with a purity that almost looks like nothing, today.

90s fashion nineties Noel GallagherThe landscape has changed. What was fresh and rare in the 90s is now tired and saturated. People’s attention spans are shorter and what was sexy and provocative then is just an Instagram away.

Left - Noel Gallagher - The 1990s was a mix of 70s, sportswear & minimalism 

What could just be hype or a fresh start, it’s not just Calvin Klein that needs the 90s back. Brands like Gap and DKNY require a time when it was cool to wear a simple white T-shirt and a pair of washed jeans. What no tigers or themed gimmick? How will 2017 deal with that?!

It was easier then to impress. There was less competition and it was a slower pace of ideas and consumption.

DKNY just let their design team and Chief Ex. go and Gap has been trying to stem the decline in their sales for many years, closing stores and reducing its retail footprint. The basics market has been a race to the bottom in terms of price and the competition keeps those prices low. Will 2017 see the big 90s revival wave that these brands will ride back to popularity? Or, will it be all hype trying to shift a few pairs of overpriced pants?

So, what did we like about the 90s? I think we’re about to find out. Get ready for curtains, again!

Friday, 02 December 2016 16:17

ChicGeek Men’s Lurex Partywear 2016

Menswear Lurex Knitwear Polo JosephFirst things first, what exactly is Lurex? Lurex is a type of yarn or fabric which incorporates a glittering metallic thread. It gives the knit a sort of Christmasy makeover which is on just the right side of glittery.

It’s perfect for this time of year, under artificial lights or candles, and adds an element of reflective fun to a suit or evening wear.

I remember Prada produced a collection with lots of lurex in AW 2011 , below, and showed how it could look fresh and interesting in knitwear and accessories. I ended up buying a knitted tie. Lurex on men shows an element of confidence in the wearer and somebody you instantly gravitate to at a party. Get involved!

Here is a selection of what is available this season: 

Prada lurex AW 2011 menswearFar Left - Joseph - Lurex Merinos Polo - £195

Left - Vintage - Prada AW 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lurex ASOS menswear ChristmasLeft - ASOS - Knitted Metallic T-Shirt - £25

tank top gucci lurex menswearLeft - Gucci - Lurex Jacquard Tank Top - £440 from LN-CC

Below - Balenciaga - Men’s Slip-on Lurex - £325

Balenciaga lurex trainers sneakers

AMI knitwear lurex menswear style bloggerLeft - AMI - Men’s Round Neck Pull In Lurex - £235

Topman lurex knitwear 2016 the chic geekLeft - Topman - Lurex Top - £20