Wednesday, 21 June 2017 12:47

London Menswear Trends Scrapbook SS18

Large Orange Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMBig Coloured Bags

If you're a man carry man-sized stuff around, you need a man-sized bag, obvs. Matching it with your hair is up to you.

From Far Left - Tourne de Transmission, Berthold

LOVE & PEACE

Who was it that once sang, ‘All you need is love’? Well, whomever it was, London needs a bit of a cuddle right now.

Below - Oliver Spencer, Bodybound

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWM

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMCanary Yellow

Just as orange has become a menswear staple colour, it's now time for primary yellow.

From Far Left - Kiko Kostadinov, Berthold

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMAndrogynous ‘Non Binary’ Club Kids

Men’s and women’s fashion collections are merging so they may as well make it all androgynous, unisex and non-binary. They’ll save a fortune!

Anything goes? Yep! Read more here

From Far Left - Charles Jeffrey Loverboy, Art School

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

String Vests

Alf Garnett becomes the style icon for SS18.

From Below Left - Per Götesson, Nicholas Daley, Bodybound, Katie Eary

 Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWM 

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMName Badges

Networking, fashionably so.

Far Left - Miharayasuhiro, Blood Brother

Logo Tape

Selvedge tape continues to proclaim you allegiance.

Below - Bobby Abley, Christopher Raeburn

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWM

Striped Rowing Jackets

Keep putting your oar in? Don't stop. Discover the new brand Rowing Blazers - here

From Below Left - Topman Design, Songzio, Hackett, Kent & Curwen, Kent & Curwen

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWM

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMBrexit Breakup

Border control. Who needs the eye scanner when you can wear this?

Left - Bobby Abley

Characters

The first rule of fashion week - always end your show on a high.

Below - Bobby Abley, Liam Hodges

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWM

 

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMCycling Shorts

Fashion gets streamlined. Bike optional.

From Far Left - Martine Rose, Daniel W Fletcher, Wan Hung

Tie Fasteners

Fashion loves a few pointless dangly bits.

From Below - Tourne de Transmission, D.GNAK 

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWM

 

Large Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMLarge Yellow Bag Menswear LFWMBig Zips

Who knew big zips could be so slimming?

Both - Miharayasuhiro

Wednesday, 21 June 2017 09:33

Hot List The Henley Hackett Tie

Hackett Henley Regatta Club Tie RowersIt seems we need an occasion to wear a tie, today. So, what better an occasion then, than watching tall posh boys grunt and strain while pushing along the River Thames?

Hackett has teamed up with Henley Regatta for their first clothing tie-up in their long history. Featuring striped rowing blazers - which I’m all about ATM - here - and branded tops, it’s this tie which really caught my eye. The design is fun yet still firmly in the club mould and is a great price for a Made in England tie.


Left & Below - Hackett - Henley Royal Regatta Man Row Stripe Tie - £65

Hackett Henley Regatta Club Tie Rowers

Tuesday, 20 June 2017 11:58

Tried & Tested Dorco Classic Razor

Based in South Korea, Dorco has over 60 years’ of expertise in offering advanced blade technology. With seven precision-aligned blades, this razor is said to be a world first and is, now, available in the UK.

The Dorco Classic has slimmer, denser blades to reduce any irritation to the skin.  It has an open structure design to enable easy rinsing, helping to keep blades sharper for longer.  A honeycomb guard bar with soft rubber surface allows effortless gliding over skin, adapting to the contours of your face. An advanced lubricating strip with antioxidants from argan oil and calendula extract helps sooth sensitive and dry skin, and heal razor burns.  

Left - Count them! All 7 blades of the Dorco Classic Razor

TheChicGeek says, “We’re entering “Razor Wars” within the grooming market with so many new or new to the market shaving brands launching. It’s a bit like the “Cola Wars”, but without the sugar! The dominant players challenged by young upstarts beating them on innovation and price.

Anything from South Korea always makes you sit up and take notice. They are insatiable consumers of grooming products and provide quality and newness to men’s grooming. 

It wasn't that long ago that manufacturers kept adding the number of the blades to their razors and this was the tah-dah moment of their new launches. I’ve never seen 7 before and they are very compact here.

On first impressions, this looks quite old-fashioned. The chrome and plastic is along the lines of a classic fountain pen and looks like a razor that would come with a matching chrome stand.

I tried it on fairly long stubble and it worked well with no discomfort. It rinsed easily, even with the large number of blades. I didn't really notice the lubricating strip doing anything.

I did think it would be more expensive then it is. Prices for the Dorco Classic start from £8.74 and there’s even free shipping for orders over £10. www.razorsbydorco.co.uk So, it’s very affordable, it’s just a shame it doesn't look more contemporary. 

London Club Kids LFWM Charles JeffreyIt seems there’s competition for Charles Jeffrey’s party crown. The young designer who gave us a gritty and sweaty club night presentation at the ICA and, last season, giant monsters running around the catwalk followed by a wave of dancers, isn’t the only one offering us a new interpretation of the London ‘Club Kid’.

At this afternoon’s MAN show, ‘Art School’ made its dramatic debut with a small collection that was big on personality and, despite really pushing the androgyny and drag of menswear, was a believable treat. Entitled ‘Queer Couture’, designers Eden Loweth & Tom Barratt, say it is ‘rooted in a cast who are emblems of trans defiance’ and ‘the unfolding narrative of a non binary paradise to be indulged in’.

London Club Kids LFWM Charles Jeffrey

Translated that means boys as girls and clothes moulded and designed around the wearer and not the usual conformist approach. Slutty Swarovski covered hooded mini dresses in scarlet red mixed with biased cut dresses and splits to the gusset. The only way of spotting the girls from the boys was to look at their legs. 

Left & Right - Charles Jeffrey's 'Loverboy'

While exhibitionist, it felt real and believable. It could simply be the models’ conviction, but it felt more than that.

Charles Jeffrey’s first standalone ‘Loverboy’ show was an ‘orgy’ of ‘clothes made of dreams’. Labelled ‘Queer hedonism’, this time, it was a theatrical display that included a crocheted daisy thong and Elizabethan finery. Jeffrey has become a poster boy for this polysexual energy of the city’s young and while it’s caught their’s and our imagination, I can’t help but think it’s a shame there isn’t a bigger scene for all this go with. I’m thinking music and clubs, because, as we all know, this has been in decline for most of this century. Of course, there are pockets, especially in East London, but you feel like you need a New Romantic moment that resonates into wider society.

London Club Kids LFWM MAN Art School

And, this brings me back to Jeffrey’s collection. While fun and entertaining, it felt more like costume and the clothes dictating the wearer. While the tailoring is there, Vivienne Westwood’s shadow was ever present, especially with the styling and Blackadder type Elizabeth I wigs. 

London Club Kids LFWM MAN Art SchoolIt feels like he needs to go back to the club and think less about the show and spectacle of fashion week. There was too much going on and didn't feel as raw and as fresh as previous shows.

Left & Right - Art School

But one thing is for sure, London’s young is sandwich between high rents, student loans and low pay and need this. This is the generation where, while they have the freedom, they feel handicapped by the older generation and in a cultural landscaped that is being squeezed.

This is fashion that inspires the creative. It's time for a night of a escapism.

 

Flaming June made her appearance as Jermyn Street was transformed into a blazing celebration of men’s style. The festival spirit took over the Mayfair thoroughfare as the usual hum of traffic was replaced by the buzz of a catwalk space and a handpicked selection of British food and drink vendors.

The third open air catwalk show from St James’s London showcased the best of the current season from retailers within the St James’s area. Key pieces from contemporary brands Paul & Shark and Norwegian Rain were mixed with heritage favourites such as New & Lingwood and Turnbull & Asser. Styled by Grace Gilfeather, Fashion Editor at GQ, it ran the full wardrobe gamut from formal to holiday.

I took my place on the front row and saw the updating of timeless British style using knitwear from JohnSmedley, luxury basics from Sunspel and key outerwear styles. Reimagined for the 21st century gentleman, while rooted in the foundations of St James’s which has drawn men’s shoppers for centuries, this showcase was a timely reminder how very relevant and important this part of London is to the British menswear industry.

 

Topman Design Lennon Gallagher LFWMWe’re on the eve of London Fashion Week Men’s and, while celebrating its 5th year, the biannual event is having to deal with the changing menswear landscape. Brands are cutting expenditure, many are merging men’s with women’s, budgets are under pressure and London Fashion Week needs to be justified more than ever.

Left - The new face of Topman AW17, Lennon Gallagher giving good brows

The closed, industry facing idea of fashion weeks is over and it’s all about photo opportunities and customer facing events. It’s about promotion, harnessing the buzz and trying to get some direct return on the costly investment.

Perfectly illustrating this is Topman Design. One of the originals on the London men’s schedule and  the first to really elevate high-street to a catwalk proposition, Topman Design has decided to shelve the show and instead have a presentation for its new SS18 collection that will be thrown open to the general public over the weekend. Arcadia, the parent of Topman, has seen sales falling and this puts pressure on making these type of events perform.

A ‘multi-media event’ called ‘Transition’, the Topman Design installation is curated by a series of collaborators.. Each collaborator will ‘own’ a space and create an installation showcasing their interpretation of this attitude with each room having a completely different and fresh perspective to create a unique journey through the space. 

The event takes place at the Old Truman Brewery and open to the public on Saturday 10th and Sunday 11th June between 10am and 6pm. To gain access to the event simply download the DICE app on the App Store and Google Play or at DICE.fm.

Collaborators featured include photographer and filmmaker Nick Offord, musicians ‘The Rhythm Method’, poet and writer Max Wallis, architect and filmmaker Ben Cullen Williams and  photographer and creative director Campbell Addy who will be working alongside illustrator King Owusu. In addition the space housing the installation will be designed by young British architect Benni Allan of estudio b.

The space will also feature a pop-up shop selling exclusive apparel featuring prints and graphics taken from and inspired by the Topman Design archive as well as exclusive pieces from the collaborators exhibiting.

Opening the fashion week up to the city makes it an event and creates the momentum that continues to keep these things going. We need to see more of this and not simply 'See Now, Buy Now'. I was thinking when they pedestrianise Oxford Street, it could become the location for fashion week. Clear marquees could hold shows and outside screens could showcase collections to the general public increasing interest and firmly keeping British fashion as the centre of creativity and the city. 

Increasing the public's interest in fashion and fashion week and taking it out of its bubble should be the main objective this LFWM.

 

Page 1 of 39