Tuesday, 27 August 2019 15:05

#OOTD 126 Mellow Yellow

Menswear OOTD The Chic Geek Blogger American Apparel yellow polo ralph lauren trousers Falke socks sandals

They call me 'Mellow Yellow', arite? Total colour dressing is a big trend at the moment, you only have to look at young Irish designer, Robyn Lynch - see more here - to see the attraction.

It's a bit like colourful Kanye and is as playful as is it simple, looking the same from the front and back. It's part cult, part uniform but total sunshine, especially in this glorious yellow. Now, it just has to stop raining...

Credits - #Gifted - Yellow Sweatshirt - American Apparel, Sandals - Grenson, Socks - Falke #NotGifted - Trousers - Polo Ralph Lauren

Menswear OOTD The Chic Geek Blogger American Apparel yellow polo ralph lauren trousers Falke socks sandals

Menswear OOTD The Chic Geek Blogger American Apparel yellow polo ralph lauren trousers Falke socks sandals

Menswear OOTD The Chic Geek Blogger American Apparel yellow polo ralph lauren trousers Falke socks sandals

Menswear OOTD The Chic Geek Blogger American Apparel yellow polo ralph lauren trousers Falke socks sandals

Menswear OOTD The Chic Geek Blogger American Apparel yellow polo ralph lauren trousers Falke socks sandals

Published in Outfit of the Day
Tuesday, 27 August 2019 13:31

ChicGeek Comment Fashion Pact Mañana

Fashion Pact G7 Pinault FrancoisA large bulk of the fashion industry is feeling pretty smug with itself. The just-gone G7 summit in Biarritz, France, a meeting of the world’s largest economies, saw French President Emmanuel Macron, accompanied by Economy and Finance Minister, Bruno Le Maire, Minister of Labour, Muriel Pénicaud, and Deputy Minister of Ecological and Solidary Transition, Brune Poirson, launch the ‘Fashion Pact’. An initiative to minimise the environmental impact of the fashion industry, the Fashion Pact, signed by various fashion companies and brands, made numerous commitments regarding sustainability, renewable energy and biodiversity.

Left - Tall glass of Pinault?! The 'Fashion Pact' launch at the recent G7 summit

Making plenty of noise, and, while anything in the right direction, particularly while the Amazon rainforest is burning, is welcome, it’s worth looking at some of the detail.

Thirty two companies representing around 150 brands and roughly 30% of the fashion industry committed to:

“100% renewable energy across own operations with the ambition to incentivise implementation of renewables in all high impact manufacturing processes along the entire supply chain by 2030.”

“Protect the oceans: by reducing the fashion industry’s negative impact on the world’s oceans through practical initiatives, such as gradually removing the usage of single-use plastics.”

“Restore biodiversity: by achieving objectives that use Science-Based Targets to restore natural ecosystems and protect species.”

“Stop global warming: by creating and deploying an action plan for achieving the objective of zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, in order to keep global warming below a 1.5°C pathway between now and 2100.”

These all feel like the least they can do. Words like ‘gradually’ and ‘ambition’ make most of this wishful thinking. But, waiting until 2050 to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions is laughable. Most of the signatories will be dead by then. It’s 31 years away!!! Who’s to say any of these companies will still be in business?

We live in a very stressful and confusing time. Environmental paralysis is understandable amongst consumers not sure exactly what they can do to combat climate change. But, waiting until 2050 to ‘possibly’ make that new handbag zero carbon emissions ain’t one of them. Green lip service is becoming increasingly frustrating and brands are going to have to give definite and distinct decisions while updating consumers on progress and fact based information much faster than this. People want to see something.

The brands involved include adidas, Bestseller, Burberry, Capri Holding Limited, Carrefour, Chanel, Ermenegildo Zegna, Everybody & Everyone, Fashion3, Fung Group, Galeries Lafayette, Gap Inc, Giorgio Armani, H&M Group, Hermès, Inditex, Karl Lagerfeld, Kering, La Redoute, matchesfashion.com, Moncler, Nike, Nordstrom, Prada Group, Puma, PVH Corp., Ralph Lauren, Ruyi, Salvatore Ferragamo, Selfridges Group, Stella McCartney and Tapestry.

In April 2019, ahead of the G7 meeting, Emmanuel Macron gave François-Henri Pinault, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Kering, a mission to bring together the leading players in fashion and textile, with the aim of setting practical objectives for reducing the environmental impact of their industry. And the Fashion Pact was born.

This goes someway to explain the most noticable luxury absentee from the list, the LVMH group. LVMH, Kering's main luxury competition, announced in May that it was partnering with Unesco on a five-year deal, allowing the fashion houses in the group access to “a network of experts at the regional level and in different disciplines to drive the development and success of their initiatives to protect biodiversity” and secure transparent supply chains. They’ve also recently cemented a tie-up with British designer Stella McCartney to lead their charge in sustainable luxury.

The majority of these brands don’t know what the eco-future looks like, but they know they need to start making the right noises yet want to continue to generate billions of dollars in yearly turnovers. Signing up to things like the ‘Fashion Pact’ focuses minds, but the time frame makes it a case of we’ll start tomorrow, which goes against the current urgent 'Climate Emergency' feeling felt within the wider population.

Kering issued a statement saying, “Private companies, working alongside nation states, have an essential role to play in protecting the planet. With the Fashion Pact, some leading players in the fashion and textile sector are joining forces for the first time to launch an unprecedented movement. A collective endeavour by its nature, the Fashion Pact is open to any company that wants to help to fundamentally transform the practices of the fashion and textile industry, and to meet the environmental challenges of our century.”

If these luxury companies worked as quickly as they did when chucking money at Notre-Dame, after its fire, then we’d really be getting somewhere. Pinault found €100m (£90m) down the back of the sofa and the Arnault family stumped up €200m within hours of the flames being put out.

Governments will need to bring in legislation much sooner to force these companies to do more. We’re going to look back at this period of history and wonder how we got through it sanely, but what we know is, we have to start today.

Published in Fashion
Friday, 16 February 2018 17:17

ChicGeek Comment Preppy With A Small ‘p’

Brooks Brothers 200th anniversary preppy with a small p

Brooks Brothers 200th anniversary preppy with a small p

Fashion doesn’t happen in isolation. Large corporations can influence fashion and push their aesthetic through with the help of wads of cash. This, sometimes, makes the companies bigger and more money and so the cycle continues. But, a shift can often beach the whale and sportswear has thrown the preppy baby out with the bath water. Apologises. 

I’ve written about the troubles with preppy before, Read more hereusually focussing on Ralph Lauren as the flag bearer, quite literally, of the look and its reluctance to change or evolve to suit the current taste in comfort and dress down.

Left - Brooks Brothers' 200th Anniversary Show at Pitti Uomo 93

That was a while ago, and with people soon to get bored of looking like a charity shop reject or a retro sportsperson, it’s inevitable that it will return. 

So, we move to Florence for the 93rd edition of Pitti Uomo. Brooks Brothers is one of the chosen brands to show and they are celebrating their 200th year. Which, for any retailer, let alone an American one, is something to be very proud of.

Under the painted ceiling of the Palazzo Vecchio, a deep presidential blue curtain pulled back to reveal an orchestra playing ‘Empire State Of Mind’. So far, so good. Out came the models in various guises of preppy, yet it had been styled to mute their greatest hits. Cable knits over jackets and suit jackets tucked into trousers, it looked like a collection embarrassed to brushed with the preppy magic.

Brooks Brothers can lay claim to dressing presidents and charting the evolution of American style over the last 200 years. This should have been preppy so good that you’d bounce out of the show and be googling ‘John F Kennedy Jnr’ before you hit the cobbles of Florence’s Piazza della Signoria.

Unfortunately, this wasn't the case. This should have been a celebration of America’s 20th century power and the handsome, dashing evolution of that dressed style into preppy and the history of American fashion.

Brands like Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren need to push in order to return to fashion favour. There’s no point in sitting back and waiting for the tide to come back in on your style. Push preppy, push suiting, push people looking like they give a shit. There was was no fight here.

Preppy isn’t fully dead, it just needs to be really good. There are new American brands like Rowing Blazers, and British brand, Drake’s, is a perfect example. They manage to make preppy feel artistic, creative and beautiful. It’s the colours, the prints and the detail that makes you want to explore the fun and exaggerated side of preppy and, shock horror, put a tie on! Maybe.

Published in Fashion
Monday, 30 October 2017 16:54

Hot List The Fancy Western Shirt

RRL Ralph Lauren western shirt The Chic Geek menswear top picks

As American as apple pie and a lack of gun control, the cowboy shirt is one of the most romantic and masculine of menswear items. This beauty from Ralph Lauren's Double RL label popped off their US website and is constructed from a medium-weight Japanese wool blend fabric with a Concho button at the neck. Chain-stitched embroidery uses ombré threads in a vintage Western–inspired spur motif created exclusively for Double RL.

This is the kind of shirt you'll have forever and keep returning to time and time again. 

Left & Below - RRL - Stretch Wool Western Shirt - $495

RRL Ralph Lauren western shirt The Chic Geek menswear top picks

Published in The Fashion Archives

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Rochas

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

The Crystal Maze Jumpsuit

The all-in-one becomes a style adventure as the jumpsuit, finally, makes into men's wardrobes. Think of it as a cost saver, as you get a top and bottom in one.

From Left - Rochas, Prada, Prada, Lanvin,

Below - From Left - Ralph Lauren, Facetasm, Ami, Cerruti1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Ralph LaurenMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada Cerruti 1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Collars

The shirt is back! -you heard it here first - so that also means the collar is too. Wear it messy and open.

From Left - Prada, Marni, Wooyoungmi, Valentino

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Name Badges

This trend followed on from London - here

Left - Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaThe Soviet Shoulder

Forget the Cold War, it's all about the cold shoulder for SS18. Think big and high. More hunched than hench!

From Left - Prada, Thom Browne,  Rick Owens, Paul Smith

Below Left - Balenciaga, Wooyoungmi, Dries van Noten

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Return of the Tie

We've seen the shirt - above - is back, so it only seems fitting that the neck tie makes a reappearance.

From Left - Marni, Marni, Kenzo, SSS World Corp

From Below - Paul Smith, Wooyoungmi, Fendi, Antonio Marras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Clashing

The less it matches the better.

Left - Marni, Sacai

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical Stripes

They make you taller & thinner? Where do I sign?!

Left - Marni, Balmain, Etudes, Haider Ackermann

Below Left - Paul Smith, Cerruti 1881, Ami

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Long Shirt

Long & loose. Just don't call it 'long-line'!

From Left - Thom Browne, Alexander McQueen, Dries van Noten, Officine Generale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

HyperFlorals

Florals on Mephedrone!

Below - Kenzo, Ami, DSquared2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Long Short Sleeves

It's all part of the larger-than-life, oversized trend of trying to make your polo shirt sleeves touch your wrists.

From Left - Balenciaga, Balenciaga, DSquared2, MSGM, Neil Barrett

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

Published in The Fashion Archives
Tuesday, 02 May 2017 10:30

Met Gala Menswear Lessons

Met Gala menswear Matt Smith Burberry bow tieMet Gala menswear Future H & M bow tieThe Met Gala - you may have seen the film, The First Monday in May - is the opening night of the annual fashion exhibition at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

This year’s exhibition is a retrospective of Japanese designer Res Kawakubo, the brains behind Comme des Garcons. As per, the opening party is the most fashion night of the year with celebrities and designers making a statement, both good and bad. 

Here are the 12 menswear things TheChicGeek learnt from last night:

Left - Bow ties - the floppier the better. Future in custom H&M & Matt Smith in Burberry 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Met Gala 2017 menswear Roger Federer Gucci cobraIf the Met Gala can make Mr Safe, Roger Federer, try something different then that’s inspiration enough. A Gucci cobra on your back, anyone? Asp-leisure?!

Jaden Smith Louis Vuitton Met Gala Menswear hairGo conceptual. If your hair looks like wheat-sheafs then take them with you. Jaden Smith in Louis Vuitton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Met Gala menswear lessons Puff Daddy Rick OwensThe Met Gala red carpet is not an audition for Star Wars. Puff Daddy in Rick Owens

met gala menswear Frank Ocean BalmainWhen your parents don’t want to buy you a suit you’ll grow out of. Frank Ocean in Balmain 

Below - Dress for the city, not the designer. Nick Jonas in Ralph Lauren

Met Gala Nick Jonas Ralph Lauren Art Deco menswear

 

Met Gala best menswear Migos May 2017Bad taste Claire’s Accessories. Let the whole jewellery shop fall out. Migos

Below - Red was the colour of the night. When a suit fits this well it works. Rami Malek in Dior Homme.

met Gala menswear Rami Malek Dior Homme red

Met Gala Thom Browne menswear Diplomet gala menswear Wiz Khalifa in Thom Brown white tuxedoLeave the Thom Browne to Thom Browne. Wiz Khalifa & Diplo in Thom Browne.

When you’re tall and thin, a la Alexander Skarsgard, in Ermenegildo Zegna, you can wear anything.

Met Gala white tuxedo Alexander Skarsgard 2017 zegna

Met Gala menswear best dressed Ryan ReynoldsWhen you try and do that cute-couple-colour thing and it doesn’t work. Ryan Reynolds 

Pharrell Williams Comme des Garçons Met GalaAt Comme, anything goes, so dress down is the new dress-up. Teletubbie optional! Pharrell Williams in Comme des Garcons

Published in Fashion

Problem with Marc Jacobs BangLet’s make something clear, Marc Jacobs is a great designer, yet his business is struggling. Why is this? Business of Fashion said, on Tuesday, the label announced its decision to shutter its men’s business, ending a license agreement with Staff International, after the delivery of the Autumn/Winter 2017 season. 

Okay, Marc Jacobs menswear had disappeared recently and, to be honest, it never really have any identity and this is ultimately Marc Jacobs’ problem.

Left - Marc Jacobs going out with a Bang, now discontinued

One of the biggest designers in the world and he has difficulty establishing his own brand. Karl Lagerfeld has always been the same, but that’s a whole other ChicGeek comment.

I knew something was wrong when I went to a Coty fragrance launch, last year, and asked how the Marc Jacobs Bang fragrance was doing. They said they’d discontinued it. I was surprised because, firstly, the bottle was great and the black peppery fragrance was very wearable and commerical. Maybe it was those naked ads, starring the man himself, that tipped it over the edge!

Marc Jacobs has done a lot of things: he put Grunge on the catwalk, but unfortunately you’ll never make money from grunge, he pioneered Louis Vuitton’s ready-to-wear and introduced many great collaborations, such as Stephen Sprouse, those leopard print-type scarves were everywhere, but he’s never really owned anything. You can’t point to something and say “that’s very Marc Jacobs” which is when a brand or designer because part of the visual language and, ultimately, means longevity and heritage.

In the early 00s it was all about the Stam handbags, which were expensive, then Marc by Marc Jacobs came along and everything was really cheap. He seemed to miss the middle, sweet spot that Michael Kors has come to dominate. He was either really expensive or pocket-money cheap and that confused the brand. You never felt like spending money on Marc Jacobs.

The fashion probably wasn't expensive looking enough for the clientele who buy designer clothes the world over and when the only shop left on the street in New York that you pioneered is a book shop - BookMarc - great name BTW - it seems as though this is a signifier of how tough things are to make money from ready-to-wear even when your name is established. 

The bad news is it’s only going to get more difficult in the next few years in American fashion. Calvin Klein is hoping for a resurgence thanks to Raf Simons, Donna Karan has new owners, that will no doubt start investing heavily and Ralph Lauren is bound to hit bottom soon. They’re all chasing the same customers and competition is difficult in a saturated market. Marc Jacobs needs to decide where is wants to sit within the fashion market and aim for that. Or, hope check shirts make a major comeback!

Published in The Fashion Archives

screaming chic geek paul smith menswear SS17To call it a recession is maybe a little extreme, but let’s call it a contraction. Menswear is struggling. Some are mouthing the word #brexit but this was coming way before that and affecting international markets too, most notably America.

Like everything that goes in cycles, you have your ups and you have your downs. We’re definitely in a down cycle as brands merge their men’s and women’s and reduce the amount of labels within their brands.

Left - Inside menswear is screaming

Many are private companies so they don’t disclose profits, but when you have menswear giants like Armani and Ralph Lauren losing labels - Collezioni and Armani Jeans in the case of Armani and store closures - in the case of Ralph Lauren - then things are clearly unsustainable.

Why is this happening? The first big answer is a saturated market. Do we need much more ‘stuff’? When Ikea’s head of sustainability, Steve Howard, said we’d reached “peak stuff”, he hit the nail on the head. We’ve seen expansion online and offline and our wardrobes are bursting with clothes at every price point.

Designer fashion isn’t coming up with many new ideas and this has lead to the high-street bringing the new ideas and offering improved quality that many men are happy with. I think companies like ASOS are doing well because people are trading down to cheaper and more fun fashion and don't really wear it long enough to care about the quality.

Brands like Topman have got more and more expensive and are not reactive enough to trends and the latest gimmicks and fashions. They’ve believed in their own ‘cool’ which is dangerous for any brand. Arcadia, Topman’s parent company, has seen many high profile departures lately. Craig McGregor left his role as retail director at Topshop/Topman, after eight years, and Topshop/Topman global commercial director Matt Brewster is leaving the company. Wesley Taylor left his role as managing director of Burton and Yasmin Yusuf left as creative director of Miss Selfridge, both after more than 10 years at the business. Which all suggests the epic growth Arcadia has experienced over the last few decades has now ground to a halt. They are no longer the darling of the British high-street.

Another reason for the men’s downturn is competition is fierce and this had lead to a discount environment. People know they can wait for the sale or search the internet for a discount code. This makes margins smaller for companies which then need to sell even larger volumes. We’ve also seen growth in companies like TK Maxx that offer people the brands they want, but with heavy discounts.

Fashion has changed too. It’s very sportswear/dress down driven. These are cheap or old clothes. Looking ‘expensive’ has gone out of fashion. Brands like Balenciaga and Gosha Rubchinskiy have pioneered this style of fugly fashion and while not cheap they have prices that are more realistic and attainable.

Millennials are all about ‘experiences’ and are less materialistic, or so we’re are told. All those selfies tell a different story, but I think they want to eat out and wear something new, which ultimately means spending less. This big group of young consumers is squeezed by rents, student loans and low wages and this isn’t going to change for the foreseeable future.

In the Evening Standard on Monday, Net-a-Porter/Mr Porter boss, Alison Loehnis, said when they measured “zeitgeist buying” in the Mr Porter team they discovered the number one item was socks. “Followed by Ray-Bans and trainers.” Socks?!! Now, that is worrying. Unless Mr Porter is selling hundreds of millions of dollars worth of socks, which I doubt, then it’s a signifier of the market. It’s too expensive and they are the cheapest things they sell. It’s also one of the main gifting items and something you don’t need to try on.

Online is still only 10% of the retail market so has huge potential, but that still means 9 in every 10 pounds is spent on the high street.

Net-a-Porter/Mr Porter call their top customers ‘EIPs’, (EXTREMELY IMPORTANT PERSON) and these EIPs are the two per cent of customers who account for 40 per cent of NAP revenue. It’s dangerous to have all your eggs in a few baskets, particularly a fickle customer which many others are chasing. They’re now offering a service where the driver waits while these EIPs try things on. It’s a gimmick, but at least it shows they’re trying. These EIPS are the people shopping in Selfridges and Harrods too, while the rest of us have seen our wage packets shrink or not go as far and designer prices continue to rise. #Brexit will make imports to the UK more expensive, temporarily, but fashion will just find somewhere cheaper to make it, but it’s true the weakest wont survive this price hike or margin cut. 

Brands have been trimming the fat over the last few years and many are down to the bare bones. The recent christmas was good for retailers and I think that kept many afloat, for now.

Jaeger just announced its bankruptcy. I don’t think there’s much hope for it to survive as it is, but it’ll become a brand within Edinburgh Woollen Mill or the like. It’s the sign of the times and also the cycle of brands. There are times when a brand runs its course and no matter how much investment or time, it’s just time to let it go.

Okay, enough doom and gloom. On a positive note from a down you have an up and when a gap appears something new will come into fill it. But, our addiction to cheap clothes isn’t going anywhere which will make it very difficult for new, smaller brands or labels to compete. I think short term we’ll see more closures and less choice or a choice masked by the fact it’s a sub brand from a big retailer. H&M is just about to launch Arket.

One thing is for sure, fashion is unpredictable and that’s why I love it.

Published in The Fashion Archives

menswear trends ss17 gucci pink greenmenswear trends spring summer 2017 the chic geek bally pink greengucci menswear milan trends spring summer 2017 the chic geek pink greenItalians do it better. This seems to be the theme coming out of Milan fashion week where the Italians have taken the bull by the horns and produced some of the best menswear we’ve seen from them in a long time. You may as well go down in style!

Here are TheChicGeek’s trend highlights:

Pink/Green Scene

Think avocado and prawn cocktail sauce.

From Left - Gucci, Bally, Gucci

 

 

 

 

 

 

menswear trends milan seventies neil barrettmenswear trends milan fashion week fendi seventiesmenswear trends fresh seventies dsquared2neil barrett spring 2017 hot menswear trendsFresh 70s

The seventies got a refresh and contemporary update. Chevrons were the order of the day.

From Far Left - Neil Barrett, Fendi, Dsquared2, Neil Barrett

(See TheChicGeek meet Neil Barrett just before this collection - here)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

menswear trends spring 2017 fendi towelling coatmenswear trends fendi towelling coat spring 2017 the chic geekTowelling Coat

Knowing Fendi this is probably made from kittens. Get the robe out of the spa and take it to the street.

Both Fendi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bleach trend menswear guccimenswear trends bleach dsquared2 the chic geek spring 2017 summer menswear trends bleach the chic geek msgmmenswear trends bally spring summer 2017Bleach

More bleach. It's one way of cleaning your clothes. (See how London did it - here)

From Left - Gucci, Dsquared2, MSGM, Bally

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

trend menswear spring summer 2017 moncler gamme bleu scout menswear trends the chic geek spring summer 2017 ferragamo scoutboy scout fashion prada milan the chic geek spring summer 2017Scoutmenswear trends scout spring summer 2017 ferragamo

The most stylish men are always prepared. Now get over prepared!

From Left - Moncler Gamme Bleu, Ferragamo, Prada, Ferragamo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

evening menswear trends versacenew evening menswear dolce & gabbanaevening menswear gucci spring 2017New Evening

Nobody dresses up anymore, said no one, ever. It's time to get imaginative and experiment with new shapes including ruffles and tails.

From Left - Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, Gucci

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

jazz age menswear trends the chic geek spring 2017 dolce gabbanamenswear trends art deco missoni spring 2017 fendi menswear trends ss 17 the chic geekralph lauren menswear trends the chic geek milan ss17fashion menswear duncan grant trendsJazz Age

Jazz, great! From literal at Dolce to art-deco Marcel waves at Fendi. I thought I'd throw a painting from the era by British artist Duncan Grant for additional inspiration. 

From Left - Dolce & Gabbana, Fendi, Missoni, Fendi, Ralph Lauren 

logo belt bally spring summer 2017Logoed belts

Rediscover your waist. Suck it in and stick a letter on it. 

Left - Bally


Brand #me

Nobody does narcissism like the Italians!

Below - Giorgio Armani

brand me menswear trends the chic geek giorgio armani

Published in The Fashion Archives