menswear trends ss17 gucci pink greenmenswear trends spring summer 2017 the chic geek bally pink greengucci menswear milan trends spring summer 2017 the chic geek pink greenItalians do it better. This seems to be the theme coming out of Milan fashion week where the Italians have taken the bull by the horns and produced some of the best menswear we’ve seen from them in a long time. You may as well go down in style!

Here are TheChicGeek’s trend highlights:

Pink/Green Scene

Think avocado and prawn cocktail sauce.

From Left - Gucci, Bally, Gucci

 

 

 

 

 

 

menswear trends milan seventies neil barrettmenswear trends milan fashion week fendi seventiesmenswear trends fresh seventies dsquared2neil barrett spring 2017 hot menswear trendsFresh 70s

The seventies got a refresh and contemporary update. Chevrons were the order of the day.

From Far Left - Neil Barrett, Fendi, Dsquared2, Neil Barrett

(See TheChicGeek meet Neil Barrett just before this collection - here)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

menswear trends spring 2017 fendi towelling coatmenswear trends fendi towelling coat spring 2017 the chic geekTowelling Coat

Knowing Fendi this is probably made from kittens. Get the robe out of the spa and take it to the street.

Both Fendi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bleach trend menswear guccimenswear trends bleach dsquared2 the chic geek spring 2017 summer menswear trends bleach the chic geek msgmmenswear trends bally spring summer 2017Bleach

More bleach. It's one way of cleaning your clothes. (See how London did it - here)

From Left - Gucci, Dsquared2, MSGM, Bally

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

trend menswear spring summer 2017 moncler gamme bleu scout menswear trends the chic geek spring summer 2017 ferragamo scoutboy scout fashion prada milan the chic geek spring summer 2017Scoutmenswear trends scout spring summer 2017 ferragamo

The most stylish men are always prepared. Now get over prepared!

From Left - Moncler Gamme Bleu, Ferragamo, Prada, Ferragamo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

evening menswear trends versacenew evening menswear dolce & gabbanaevening menswear gucci spring 2017New Evening

Nobody dresses up anymore, said no one, ever. It's time to get imaginative and experiment with new shapes including ruffles and tails.

From Left - Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, Gucci

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

jazz age menswear trends the chic geek spring 2017 dolce gabbanamenswear trends art deco missoni spring 2017 fendi menswear trends ss 17 the chic geekralph lauren menswear trends the chic geek milan ss17fashion menswear duncan grant trendsJazz Age

Jazz, great! From literal at Dolce to art-deco Marcel waves at Fendi. I thought I'd throw a painting from the era by British artist Duncan Grant for additional inspiration. 

From Left - Dolce & Gabbana, Fendi, Missoni, Fendi, Ralph Lauren 

logo belt bally spring summer 2017Logoed belts

Rediscover your waist. Suck it in and stick a letter on it. 

Left - Bally


Brand #me

Nobody does narcissism like the Italians!

Below - Giorgio Armani

brand me menswear trends the chic geek giorgio armani

Published in Fashion

bleach denim menswear trends london casely hayfordmenswear trends SS17 mihara yasuhiroWhere was everybody? That could have been the final statement when it came to London’s latest round of men’s shows and presentations. Having dropped from 77 to 57, the number of brands showing was a reflection in the current oversupply of fashion brands and collections. LCM felt a little vacant and, unfortunately, what was left didn’t exactly set the menswear world on fire.

Here are a few trends TheChicGeek spied to take us into the new year:

Bleached Wail

It's 40 years since punk first burst on to the British streetwear scene and to celebrate designers have been getting creative with a bottle of Domestos.

From Left - Casely-Hayford, Mihara Yasuhiro (See how to make your own pair of bleachers - here)

per gotesson menswear trends london SS17edward crutchley menswear mattresses the chic geekMattresses

Tracey Emin rang, she wants her spare bed back! Could it be a comment on generation rent and the nomad status of today’s young and creative generation or maybe it was simply the lazy option. Expect to see 'Dreams' as the headline sponsor of the next LCM or London Fashion Week Men’s as it is now called. 

From Left - Per Götesson, Edward Crutchley

menswear trends towelling siblingtowelling playsuit topman design ss17 the chic geek trends Playful Towelling

Nothing says 'playful' like Terry towelling. And while a playsuit maybe taking things too far, if you've got the legs...

From Left - Sibling, Topman Design

menswear trends ss17 craig greenmenswear trends ss17 craig green scarfFlag To The Mast

Tie your sartorial flag to the mast and dress like a walking United Nations.

Both Craig Green

Doodlebug

Colouring in is so 2015! Get that Sharpie out and start to doodle to your heart's content.

Below - Coach

menswear coach doodle jacket trends leather

giant zips menswear trends mihara yassuhirojw anderson zips menswear trends ss17menswear trends ss17 mihara yasuhiroProminent Zips

Zips go man-sized, this season, and take centre stage.

From Left - Mihara Yasuhiro, JW Anderson, Mihara Yasuhiro

menswear trends london grace wales bonnerFresh Seventies

Large lapels yet streamlined shapes make this a contemporary seventies revival.

Left - Wales Bonner (See more from this trend in Milan)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

menswear trends casely hayford tribal ss17menswear trends tribal grace wales bonnermenswear trends charles jeffrey the chic geekTribal

Fashion tribes take inspiration from ethnic jewellery and the play with masculinity and decoration.

Left - Casely-Hayford, Wales Bonner, Charles Jeffrey

menswear trends pink green jw andersonmenswear SS17 trends jw anderson pink greenPink/Green

The colour combo of the season. Bubblegum to fuchsia, lime to forest, these two colours work in every combination.

Both JW Anderson (See more from this trend in Milan)

Published in Fashion

The first day of LCM, London's men's fashion week, started. At the end of a long day TheChicGeek's thoughts about the menswear business at the moment and how we need to move away from 'Instagram' fashion and get back to the fundamentals of design.

Published in Fashion

farah logo earlham street londonTheChicGeek turns 7, this month, and to celebrate I have joined forces with one of my favourite menswear brands, Farah, for a party at their flagship store. in Earlham Street, Covent Garden. 

In the run up to the party, TheChicGeek and Farah will be running a daily competition, for 7 days, to win £200 worth of Farah clothing.

farah menswear covent gardenHow do I WIN?!!!

All you have to do is visit the store on any of the 7 days (18-24 May), find TheChicGeek’s birthday gift box and have your picture taken with it, posting to Twitter or Instagram, tagging @thechicgeekcouk @farahmenswear  and #thechicgeekxfarah for your chance to win.

Interior Farah store earlham street covent gardenAs well as some great pieces of clothing from Farah, you’ll also win 2 tickets to attend TheChicGeek’s birthday party on the 25 May. Good luck!

* The party is invitation only.

For competition T&Cs visit http://www.farah.co.uk/terms-and-conditions.html


 

Published in Competitions

moses mods mr fishA new exhibition charting the emergence of the modern male wardrobe has opened at the Jewish Museum in Camden, London .

cecil gee shaftesbury avenue 60s london birdThis new exhibition tells the story of men’s fashion and the emergence of the modern male wardrobe – taking visitors on a journey from the tailoring workshops of the mid-19th century to the boutique revolution and mod culture of the Swinging 60s. The story is told through the huge number of Jewish companies who were at the forefront of the major developments and changes in the design, manufacturing and retail of men’s clothing from the mid-19th to late 20th century.

Right - Cecil Gee, who helped bring the 1960s Italian Mod look to London, in his Shaftesbury Avenue store in the 1960s. I love the birdcage

mr fish peacock male menswearFor over 100 years British menswear set trends which led the world – and many of the most influential figures of that period were Jews, from Montague Burton and Moses Moss to Cecil Gee and Michael Fish. 

Left & Below - Mr Fish outfit & label on a 'Kipper' tie from his store in Mayfair

Mr Fish kipper tieTheChicGeek says, “I hadn’t been to the Jewish Museum before and, as far as I know, this is the first exhibition they’ve had dedicated to menswear. It’s a concise and compact exhibition starting with the early mass suit producers such as Burton and Moses Moss up to the colourful Peacock Males of Carnaby Street.

It’s a simple timeline with lots of images and a few films illustrating the processes these manufacturers invented and also giving a feel of the time these things were happening. 

I didn’t realise so many of the Carnaby street sixties brands such as Mr Fish, Granny Takes A Trip, Lord John etc. were all Jewish and it’s always a joy to see this colourful chapter in British menswear. 

The exhibition is perfectly timed as the Mr Fish label is set to return under new ownership. The original Michael Fish is said to not be very well and he doesn’t have many examples of his own work left, unfortunately. The exhibition does has a couple of pieces, including one of his famous ‘Kipper’ ties, lent by the Victoria & Albert museum. While Jewishness doesn't necessarily have an influence on the product, this is a celebration of the Jewish community's input into British menswear over the last 150 years."

Until 19th June 2016 

www.jewishmuseum.org.uk

Published in Fashion
Monday, 23 November 2015 18:49

ChicGeek Comment - Bye, Bye, Brands

harvey nichols new menswear department chic geekKnightsbridge based department store, Harvey Nichols, has been busy excavating their basement. Long the home of their menswear offering, this cavernous yet claustrophobic space is, we are told, being completely made over ready for its unveiling in spring 2016. 

Left - Harvey Nichols' new store in Birmingham which gives us the direction stylistically of the Knightsbridge store's new men's basement.

So, what’s new? I recently attended a presentation of theirs describing how the new spaces are going to look. Bye, bye shop-in-shops and branded concessions: long the bastion of mega-brands, physically claiming prime spots in-store to be replaced by easily changeable spaces and the mixing of brands.

I'd like to think of it as a more democratic form of shopping: allowing labels to speak to people solely on product alone without the pre-judgement of walking over to a branded section or the muscling out of smaller brands by placing them in the parts of the store these mega-brands don’t want.

The big brands won’t like this. They will sell less. There will now be an equal playing field between them and whichever new brands Harvey Nichols decide to stock. It also allows Harvey Nichols to drop brands faster, regardless of size, to keep pace with the speed of fashion and allowing new brands to bring excitement and interest into their physical store.

People are tired of seeing the same brands everywhere regardless of how expensive they are. It also allows a form of curation rather than simply a mini-mall of the same designer names which you can find the world over.

harvey nichols menswear april 2016 the chic geekHarvey Nichols know they can’t compete with the likes of Harrods and Selfridges on menswear floor space, so, they are making theirs more flexible and less static. This is a very clever idea.

Right - More interiors from Harvey Nichols Birmingham. Let's hope London looks this good

In order to survive shops need to become destinations. They need to offer something you can’t find anywhere else: something new, fresh and inspiring. They also have to flow, both visibly and physically, and, ultimately, part time-poor people with their cash.

One of the more interesting ideas they have is putting all the same things together. So, white T-shirts, tuxedos etc., all at different price points, selected by Harvey Nichols, are together with the sales assistants explaining the differences between them all.

Fashion’s big names have long earnt their corners of the big stores, but they sell more and remain powerful because they have the best positions and are, therefore, stuck in a positive cycle which is very hard to break, making retail spaces look the same every time and everywhere. It all becomes quite predictable and menswear buyers and the retailers want something different and exciting while still retaining the spend.

Harvey Nichols is seeing this refresh as an opportunity to try something new. No doubt they’ll be some difficult discussions with brands, but I hope they hold their ground and give these ideas a chance to prove that the customer, now, buys into good product rather than brands. Menswear just got a level playing field!

Opening April 2016

Published in Fashion
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