Wednesday, 17 October 2018 09:37

ChicGeek Comment The Mass Male Sneakerheads

Male consumers are biggest footwear buyers sneakerheads trainers sneakersYoung men are officially the biggest consumers of footwear in the UK. Move over Carrie Bradshaw, or is that reference way too old when you consider many of these 16-24 year old men weren’t even born when she started shopping for her Manolos.

According to the latest research from Mintel on footwear retailing, 95% of British males aged 16-24 bought shoes last year, making them Britain’s number one footwear buyers.

There’s been a revolution in men buying shoes and while women (86%) are still more likely to purchase footwear than men (78%), females aged 16-24 (10%) are twice as likely to have not purchased footwear in the last year compared to their male counterparts (5%), as the continuation of the casual and ‘athleisure’ trends drive men’s footwear sales.

Male shoe addicts are fast catching up on women. Men’s footwear accounted for 37% of all footwear sales in 2017, up from 34% in 2015. Valued at £4.38 billion in 2017, sales of men’s shoes increased an impressive 31% between 2015 and 2017. In comparison, sales of women’s shoes grew by only 10% over the same period to reach £5.48 billion in 2017.

“Men’s footwear, particularly among younger age groups, is really fuelling growth in the footwear sector.” says Chana Baram, Retail Analyst at Mintel. “In fact, our research shows that men aged 16-24 are more likely to be swayed by big brand names than women of the same age.” says Baram. “With trainers such a popular category for men as a whole, young men in particular are likely to respond positively to advertising campaigns by the big sports brands that feature their favourite male sports personalities.” she says.

This footwear sales growth is being fuelled by trainers, trainers and more trainers. Casual shoes and trainers are now the most popular shoe styles purchased by men.

“These are not just essential buys, but, got-to-have-it buys,” says Richard Wharton, footwear veteran and founder of Office & Offspring. “It’s all about the latest sneaker, there are millions version of that: the luxe trend, the Balenciaga Triple S, Off-White, Converse or Vans or whatever.” says Wharton. “These young guys have never worn formal shoes or been forced into wearing them at school. They buy what they want,” he says.

“Sneaker culture has really grown, from being a niche market to having mass appeal,” says Pamela Dunn, Senior Buyer, Schuh. “The rise of exclusive collabs and hard-to-get releases from brands like Nike/Adidas has fuelled the sneaker market.” she says.

In our age of sportswear and dress-down, our footwear choices have mirrored this and what was once unacceptable in certain social situations has now become mainstream and mass. Comfort is key.

“In modern offices nobody wears any other formal attire anymore so it’s acceptable to wear sneakers,” says Wharton. “Hype’s there. Before you didn’t have trainers for different occasions,” says Wharton. “Where you had that in formal wear, you, now, have that in sneakers: all black sneaker for work, weekend, something casual, or a club, maybe Dior or Louboutin,” he says.

The trainer market has grown to such as size that there is now multiple categories within this market and men are buying a full wardrobe of trainers for every social occasion. Designer brands have piled into this market seeing big margins and huge volumes. But what are these guys buying into? 

“Big brands at a more mass market level like Nike/Adidas or more top level brands include Off-White / Gucci / LV etc.” says Dunn.

“It’s so broad. They are buying high-end street couture to basic Vans or Converse,” says Wharton. “Nike rules with guys buy into their new technology. There are huge queues waiting for the next thing and Nike limit it, so they drip feed it in.” he says.

Boys are buying brands and this may go someway to explain the latest movements within the men’s footwear market. Ted Baker recently bought back its shoe license for £21 million. The fashion brand bought ‘No Ordinary Shoes’, the worldwide licensee, from the Pentland Group. “This is an exciting opportunity to drive further growth in our footwear business by leveraging our global footprint and infrastructure, in line with our strategy to further develop Ted Baker as a global lifestyle brand,” said Ted Baker founder Ray Kelvin. 

As Pentland lost Ted Baker, it appointed Marc Hare as the new ‘Product Director of the Lacoste Footwear Joint Venture’. He will be leading the new ‘Mainline’ and ‘Future Concepts’ product teams and working with Lacoste JV CEO, Gianni Georgiades, to support the company's vision for the brand. Marc Hare is known for his luxury evening styles and his, now, defunct Mr Hare footwear label. It’ll be interesting to see whether Pentland want to grow Lacoste further out from its sporty origins or use Hare’s skill by giving those sports shoes an elevation to compete within the luxury sneaker market.

What these brands see is growth, but is there further room for expansion or is the market becoming saturated?

“I think males will increasingly buy into footwear in the future, but the market will change,” says Dunn. “I think exclusive products may become less desirable, but brands that are big now will become even more dominant e.g. nike/adidas.” she says.

“It depends when it becomes saturation point,” says Wharton. “So many people want comfort that looks cool and there are multiple sub-genres such as Japanese sneakers, and Palace/Supreme collabs,” he says.

While the sports brands continue to offer newness, limit 'exclusive' product and raid their archives for classic styles, the trainer market seems healthy and will sustain the desire of men to keep adding to their collections. But, this rise of young men becoming the largest consumers of footwear is skewed towards one category and it will be interesting to see how the footwear industry gets this entire generation off their sport wears addiction and into a pair of leather lace-ups. 

Published in Fashion

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look Gianni Versace Assaination

The first episode of The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story premiered last night, and, while we already who know whodunnit, we don’t know why? Will we ever know? Andrew Cunanan killed himself shortly afterwards.

Left - The Andrew Cunanan character in The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

One of the highlight looks from the first episode was a Sara Lee yellow, full look of slouchy 80s-style trousers, polo shirt and matching cap. Yellow can frighten many guys and is therefore quite difficult to find in the shops. This is a softer, more pastel hue.

Right - All about Sara Lee yellow this Summer

Look at it like a dose of wardrobe vitamin D. Okay, so this did have the backdrop of Art Deco Miami, but just imagine the palm trees when you’re rolling down your local high-street with your jacket slung over your shoulder and your big serial killer shades on.

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story ASOS adidas

Left - adidas Originals - Trefoil Cap In Yellow - £15 from ASOS

Below - Don't want to be recognised? Go for serial killer sized shades

Andrew Cunanan Sunglasses Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime StoryBelow - Lacoste Live - Unisex Slim Fit Petit Piqué Polo - £85

Andrew Cunanan Sunglasses Yellow Get The Look Lacoste Polo Shirt The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left - Versace - Sunglasses - £96

Andrew Cunanan Yellow Get The Look he Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story

Left - DSquared2 - Light Yellow Suit - £521 from YOOX

See Get The Look - Call Me By Your Name

Get The Look - Wild, Wild Country

Published in Fashion
Monday, 30 October 2017 12:29

Get The Look Call Me By Your Name

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look MenswearWe seem to be fixated on the year 1983. First came Stranger Things and now, the new film by Luca Guadagnino, Call Me By Your Name. 

Left - Getting rave views - Call Me By Your Name - The new film by Luca Guadagnino, who also made I am Love & A Bigger Splash

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look MenswearA love story between Elio and Oliver, Armie Hammer and Timothée Chalamet, respectively, it is an Italian summer romance featuring the power brands of the decade.

Right - The film's wardrobe was very casual 80s brands such as Lacoste & Polo Ralph Lauren

From Polo Ralph Lauren shirts, clothing the arrogant and preppy Oliver, to the striped Lacoste polos on the young and loving Elio. 

Mix it with a bit of 80s Italian disco and copious amounts of drawstring swim shorts and you have your next warm weather wardrobe sorted. A future classic, it’s a peach of a film!

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear B D Baggies shirtsLeft - B.D. Baggies - Bradfort Oxford Butt Down-Pocket - £73

Below - Ray Ban - Original Wayfarer Classic - £127

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Ray Ban Wayfarer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Polo Ralph Lauren Green Shirt Armie HammerLeft - Ralph Lauren - Slim Fit Cotton Oxford Shirt - £95

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Lacoste polo striped shirtLeft - Lacoste - Men’s Lacoste Regular Fit Striped Pima Cotton Polo - £79

Below - Boardies - Overlay Shortie Swim Shorts - £50

Persol - Havana - £153 from Sunglasses-shop

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Boardies swim shorts 80s

Converse - Fastbreak ’83 Vintage - £70

Casio - Classic Digital Watch F-91W-1XY - £13 from ASOS

adidas - Originals Football Swim Short - £29.99 from Footasylum

See More Get The Look - The Assassination of Gianni Versace - here

Get The Look - Wild, Wild Country

Call Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Persol Sunglasses OliverCall Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Converse trainersCall Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear Casio digital watchCall Me By Your Name Get The Look MenswearCall Me By Your Name Get The Look Menswear

Published in The Fashion Archives
Friday, 28 October 2016 11:14

Hot List The Creased Track Pant

wes anderson gym kit lacosteIf Wes Anderson did gym kit then this would be the bottom half. Sports is everywhere at the moment and, if like me, you've grown used to the comfort of spending the summer in shorts and tracksuits it feels like an effort and a step backwards to put on anything else, especially regular, non-elasticated trousers. Oh, how things have changed!

Left - Lacoste FW15

I’m a big fan of what designer, Felipe Oliveira Baptista, is doing for Lacoste in their mainline catwalk collection, which they show in New York. I couldn’t find a good image from the current collection so I used last year's, but I know they do these smart creased track trousers with bold stripes as I saw them in the windows of their Knightsbridge store, yesterday.

I couldn’t find them available on the internet, but Fila do a mean retro tracksuit bottom with that ever so sharp and important crease in their Heritage collection. Go got ‘em.

Fila smart track suit bottoms chic geekLeft & Below - Fila - Molveno Trackpant - £45Fila Molveno Wes Anderson Tracksuit

Published in The Fashion Archives
Sunday, 17 May 2015 14:31

#OOTD 42 - #StreetGEEK 4/4

street geek style adidas the chic geekTheChicGeek finishes off his series of #StreetGEEK images - see all the others here - with a final skate along the Bridle Path. In classic adidas three-stripe and a Lacoste L.12.12 polo, TheChicGeek is testament to the fact that no matter how run down the location you'd should always dress to be noticed. Skate on!

#StreetGEEK

Credits - Light Blue Tracksuit Top - adidas, Blue/Yellow Tracksuit Top - adidas Y3, Polo Shirt - Lacoste, Rucksack - Porsche Design X adidas, Joggers - The White Briefs from MatchesFashion.com, Cap - Starter, Socks - Polo Ralph Lauren, Trainers - adidas

Shot by Robin Forster on #OlympusPEN

See more images below

Published in Outfit of the Day