Displaying items by tag: Knightsbridge

Thursday, 01 March 2018 11:01

ChicGeek Comment Riccardo Tisci @ Burberry

Riccardo Tisci Burberry Creative Director The Chic Geek

Burberry announces Riccardo Tisci as Chief Creative Officer effective 12 March 2018. 

Well, the cat is out of the bag and Christopher Bailey’s replacement isn’t Phoebe or Kim, but Riccardo. Something of a Creative Director curve ball, he was speculated to go to Versace, this is an exciting signing - how Premiership?! - because he could take Burberry in any direction.

Left - A sign of things to come? Tisci's Burberry Cromwellian warts 'n' all portrait

While it was all about luxury sportswear at Givenchy, during his 12 years there, his style was more American, masculine and darker in feeling, but it all started to look a bit done when Vetements arrived with its dress-down aesthetic. I think Givenchy wanted to make the brand more feminine and focussed on women’s accessorises. While he grew the ready-to-wear he seemed to neglect the beauty and accessory side.

Burberry is more slanted towards ready-to-wear, so this could be good, but I thought they wanted to grow their accessorises business?

So, Burberry opts for an Italian. Tisci’s studied and worked in Britain before, he used to be a branch manager of Monsoon, which I love, so he’ll have some idea on Britishness and also bring a fresh perspective to it. Out go the Rottweilers and sharks, and in come Corgis, Greyhounds and Beagles maybe?!

I think ‘See Now, Buy Now’, will be shelved and his first, proper full collection will be for SS19. It’ll be interesting to see whether he takes on everything like Bailey did. If the Creative Director does the stores, windows, campaigns, beauty, everything… you get a feel, faster, of how the brand is changing and its new direction. He'll give menswear as much focus as womenswear which is good.

Burberry has a big, new store opening in Knightsbridge, so it’ll be interesting to see if Tisci has time to have any input and make changes before that opens. 

Burberry is Britain’s biggest luxury brand. It’s strongest market is arguably the Chinese, at home and abroad. Keeping these consumers happy, buying and increasing will be the main future goal of any Creative Director. But, if he can please the fashion crowd, and instil much needed excitement, then it’ll keep the business growing and the shareholders happy. I think his window to make this happen will be much smaller at Burberry than at Givenchy and they’ll want to see positive change and fast. Will an Italian do it better?!

See TheChicGeek's Ode To Christopher Bailey - here

Published in Fashion
Sunday, 10 April 2016 09:22

New Harvey Nichols Menswear Knightsbridge

harvey nichols menswear the chic geekTheChicGeek says, “Finally, Harvey Nichols has put its hands in its pockets and spent on its flagship store. Luckily, for us boys, it’s the menswear department that gets the first big overhaul. Working from the bottom up, Harvey Nichol’s new menswear department has been completely redesigned and what was and still is a difficult space has been given a fresh look while sorting out the flow and differing levels.

Left - The suiting/tailoring room

The 28,000 sq. ft. department, on two floors, has moved away from the that mini-airport concession look and given itself set rooms to cater for different customers and needs. Knowing they are limited on space, Harvey Nichols, is being clever by putting brands together on product rather than in set areas. So, if you want a formal suit, then all the formal suits are together. Accessories are scatted within the rooms and work together with the clothes rather than being stuck in defined areas away from each other. This is all about time and ease which, when selling to men, is a massive USP.

harvey nichols concierge knightsbridge londonRight - The new 'Concierge'

There’s a new ‘concierge’, aka personal shopping service, in a separate area downstairs with generous changing rooms, some big enough for a whole family with their own sound systems and there’s no minimum spend.

harvey nichols turkeyAs for the design, it feels designed, but not trying to hard, which is hard to pull off. It’s not trying to be ‘expensive’ or ‘exclusive’, it feels relaxed, welcoming and inclusive. There are lots of little touches like a set of stuffed birds and toy water guns which creates personality and lowers the serious factor.

Left - The only turkey I spotted

The white marble is there, the polished copper is there, plus a few mid-century modern pieces of furniture, yet it feels fresh and very ‘2016’, which I think is cool. It feels likes the kind of warm space you’d want to spend time in and revisit. As fashion becomes more mixed and broken down to item rather than price and branding, this feels like the future direction of retail and I'd be surprised if they don't see a massive increase in sales.

Harvey Nichols needed this badly and I’m pleased they’ve got what they deserved. It’s good. Go take a look.”

Published in The Fashion Archives
Monday, 23 November 2015 18:49

ChicGeek Comment - Bye, Bye, Brands

harvey nichols new menswear department chic geekKnightsbridge based department store, Harvey Nichols, has been busy excavating their basement. Long the home of their menswear offering, this cavernous yet claustrophobic space is, we are told, being completely made over ready for its unveiling in spring 2016. 

Left - Harvey Nichols' new store in Birmingham which gives us the direction stylistically of the Knightsbridge store's new men's basement.

So, what’s new? I recently attended a presentation of theirs describing how the new spaces are going to look. Bye, bye shop-in-shops and branded concessions: long the bastion of mega-brands, physically claiming prime spots in-store to be replaced by easily changeable spaces and the mixing of brands.

I'd like to think of it as a more democratic form of shopping: allowing labels to speak to people solely on product alone without the pre-judgement of walking over to a branded section or the muscling out of smaller brands by placing them in the parts of the store these mega-brands don’t want.

The big brands won’t like this. They will sell less. There will now be an equal playing field between them and whichever new brands Harvey Nichols decide to stock. It also allows Harvey Nichols to drop brands faster, regardless of size, to keep pace with the speed of fashion and allowing new brands to bring excitement and interest into their physical store.

People are tired of seeing the same brands everywhere regardless of how expensive they are. It also allows a form of curation rather than simply a mini-mall of the same designer names which you can find the world over.

harvey nichols menswear april 2016 the chic geekHarvey Nichols know they can’t compete with the likes of Harrods and Selfridges on menswear floor space, so, they are making theirs more flexible and less static. This is a very clever idea.

Right - More interiors from Harvey Nichols Birmingham. Let's hope London looks this good

In order to survive shops need to become destinations. They need to offer something you can’t find anywhere else: something new, fresh and inspiring. They also have to flow, both visibly and physically, and, ultimately, part time-poor people with their cash.

One of the more interesting ideas they have is putting all the same things together. So, white T-shirts, tuxedos etc., all at different price points, selected by Harvey Nichols, are together with the sales assistants explaining the differences between them all.

Fashion’s big names have long earnt their corners of the big stores, but they sell more and remain powerful because they have the best positions and are, therefore, stuck in a positive cycle which is very hard to break, making retail spaces look the same every time and everywhere. It all becomes quite predictable and menswear buyers and the retailers want something different and exciting while still retaining the spend.

Harvey Nichols is seeing this refresh as an opportunity to try something new. No doubt they’ll be some difficult discussions with brands, but I hope they hold their ground and give these ideas a chance to prove that the customer, now, buys into good product rather than brands. Menswear just got a level playing field!

Opening April 2016

Published in The Fashion Archives

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