Friday, 02 November 2018 17:11

ChicGeek Comment Tours De Force

Fashion factory tours Private White ManchesterCharlie Bucket spent his last coin on a chocolate bar in the hope that it would contain a golden ticket and gain entry behind the guarded gates of Wonka’s magical factory. If Roald Dahl were to write the story, today, Veruca Salt, the spoilt brat with the "I want it NOW, daddy!!!" attitude, would probably want to see behind the walls of Louis Vuitton or Chanel rather than Cadbury’s or Nestlé.

Her wishes were granted, last month, when LVMH expanded the fourth edition of its ‘Les Journées Particulières’ open days event. Seventy six venues across four continents held 'open days', with 38 never having been open to the public previously.

The event saw 56 fashion houses, including Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior, Givenchy, Tag Heuer and Nicholas Kirkwood, taking part. New experiences included the opening of the Les Fontaines Parfumées in Grasse, the perfume creation workshop shared by Parfums Christian Dior and Louis Vuitton, the Louis Vuitton prototype workshop in the centre of Paris and the Louis Vuitton workshop in Ducey, Normandy. It was also possible to reserve an exclusive tour of La Colle Noire, Christian Dior’s last residence in Montauroux.

Left - Inside Private White V.C. in Manchester

‘Les Journées Particulières' launched in 2011 and is a LVMH marketing exercise in harnessing the desire and interest from people to see the inner workings of brands they admire and respect. It’s this element of being able to see things you feel aren’t usually on display, demystifying the processes and laying bare the inner workings of these brands that gets people to make the effort to visit.

Watchmaker, Vacheron Constantin, recently tapped into this enthusiasm by auctioning the ultimate watchmaking experience by putting two VIP tours of its workshop in Switzerland up for sale. The brand hired Sotheby’s to auction the experiences, which comprise two separate lots that it claims represent a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity” to witness its work up close. Each involves a behind-the-scenes tour through the Vacheron Constantin Maison, accompanied by style and heritage director Christian Selmoni.

It’s this ‘magic’ that people want to see and the attraction and interest in seeing how things are made and a celebration our industrial history is expanding as more brands open up their factories to the public. It gives products a halo effect of ‘special’ and really cements the brands into people’s minds and memories in a positive way.

I always say, when you go to a factory, it’s a bit like going to a friend’s house for the first time: you really get a fully rounded and immersive experience and a lasting memory. It’s a familiarity you can’t get in a shop or by simply wearing the product.

Fashion factory tours

Solovair produce their shoes in Northampton under their parental badge of The Northamptonshire Productive Society (NPS) founded in 1881 by five men in Wollaston, Northamptonshire. Ashleigh Liversage, Online Marketing Manager, NPS Shoes Ltd. says, “As more and more brands move their manufacturing outside of the UK it is important to us that our customers can come see for themselves how their footwear is made by our skilled workers in our factory in Wollaston, Northamptonshire.

Right - Exterior of the Private White V.C. factory in Manchester

“Our Managing Director takes the group on a tour through the factory offering an exciting insight into all areas of shoe production,” says Liversage. “The NPS Factory tour follows specific content-related criteria, giving guests access to all shoe production technologies: the ‘Clicking’ or cutting Room, Closing room, Levelling / Making Room, Shoe Room, while machines have made production more efficient, the fundamental process has remained the same at our factory for over a century,” she says.

“The feedback from our customers is why we continue to offer the tour, they love to see how and where their footwear is made and hear about the history and heritage of NPS Shoes,” says Liversage. “Even those with no particular interest in footwear have commented how interesting the tour is. We have people come from all over the UK to attend our tours and even had visitors from Canada once!” she says.

Over in Manchester, Private White V.C., has the last remaining clothing factory in the world’s first industrial city. Mike Stoll, Factory MD, says the reason they have a factory tour is, “To raise awareness: we actually are real and make our special garments near Manchester City centre.”

“Most people that make the tour either make a purchase or send someone who does. It spreads the word,” says Stoll, but, “It only works if you have something to see. This building is unusual and the way we currently manufacture is unique.”

North of the border, Johnstons of Elgin produce some of the world's finest knitwear and blankets. George McNeil, Johnstons of Elgin, Retail Managing Director, says, “Rarely does the public get an insight into how their products are made, and the entire craft behind the process, and so this is a chance to see quality in the making and also to understand our rich and unique history.”

Visitors get to see “Everything!” says McNeil. “Our cashmere goes from raw fibre, through dying, teasing, carding, spinning and hand finishing by the latest generation of craftsmen, all in our Elgin mill.”

“If a brand has the personal touch to each and every product, like ours, it is hugely beneficial to educate the consumer,” says McNeil. “We are in fact the last remaining vertical mill in Scotland to take raw fibre to finished product – from goat to garment – making this traditional process unique in current times. As consumers continue to prioritise where their belongings come from, and become more curious about the work that goes into them, they will demand to know more and brands will answer.” he says.

Not all brands can offer this openness though. Brands often produce for other people, called ‘Private Label’, and many brands like to keep their producers and suppliers out of the public domain.

Fashion factory tours Johnstons of Elgin

“As a manufacturer for over 160 different brands, we actually don't allow factory visits because of the issues they can cause,” says Rob Williams, Founder & Chief Financial Officer, Hawthorn International, who produce apparel for various brands. “Many fashion brands prefer for their manufacturer to keep their identity private, so that their costs cannot be revealed and so that their designs can't be shared between brands who all use the same manufacturer,” says Williams.

“Because privacy and confidentiality is so important to our clients, we found that it caused a huge logistical problem to organise factory visits without the visitor seeing any intellectual property of our other clients,” he says.

Left - Johnstons of Elgin's mill in Elgin, Scotland

Factory tours work because of a growing niche of people’s fascination with being educated about the things they buy. It works for brands who want to tell their story and, often, explain why you are paying a premium for the products. Admittedly, you get shown what they want you to see, but, it's this openness and sharing that creates an atmosphere people want to buy into.

This is the National Trust for the fashion geeks amongst us and it’s growing in popularity. Johnstons of Elgin has tea shops and restaurants attached to their mills which can also be a revenue maker for the company.

The tour makes the product come alive, you can picture what you’re buying being made and this really is the ultimate souvenir. People love a factory tour with a final stop at the factory shop for a bargain. Who needs a stately home when you can have a Victorian shoe factory?

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Published in Fashion
Wednesday, 25 October 2017 22:23

Superdry The One Stop Shop For Winter Jackets

Jackets Mens Menswear SuperdryThe relationship with your winter coat is a long - okay, well, a good few months, - and close one. Your sartorial significant other, choosing and committing to a style isn’t something to be taken lightly. So, lucky then, Superdry has a Tinder-like amount of choice, this season.

Jackets Mens Menswear SuperdryFrom lightweight bombers to full on “Everest” parkas, Superdry has the full range of jackets to suit every situation and climate.

Left - Superdry - Sport Power Down Hooded Jacket - £114.99

Traditional denim jackets have been given a modern twist with Superdry varsity badges, and “Sherpa” linings. For something more formal, they have a smart double breasted wool coat, while “Rookie” styles have the addition of military-style fastenings and adjusters, plus practical pockets, to add functionality. With offerings across a palette including “duty green" and “bullet grey”, the fleece-lined styles and detachable faux-fur trimmed hoods will ensure they keep you warm. 

Right - Superdry - Limited Edition Flight Bomber Jacket £99.99

Parkas, from heavy duty to cocoon puffa, camo print to glacier, will cope with the most intense of winter extremities, plus the addition of a luxury, high performance premium down option for the very first time. 

Jackets Mens Menswear SuperdrySuperdry’s signature wind-cheater jackets have been rebranded for AW17. Options include totally fleece-lined arctic styles, colour pop zip jackets with triple layer fastenings and microfibre wind-bombers with faux-fur detailing. These essential and easy-to-wear outdoor jackets come in a rainbow of colours to fit your personal style. 

It's now time to make your outerwear mind-up. Decisions, decisions! 

See the full collection here https://www.superdry.com/mens/jackets

Left - Superdry - Faux Fur Trimmed Everest Coat - £129.99

Right - Superdry - Remastered Rogue Trenchcoat - £124.99

*Sponsored by Superdry

Jackets Mens Menswear Superdry

Published in Fashion
Wednesday, 11 October 2017 14:38

TheChicGeek’s Best Men’s Corduroy AW17

Best Men's Corduroy Prada

Best Men's Corduroy Prada

We haven’t had a big fabric trend in menswear for a while now. Gone are the days when colours or fabrics would become ubiquitous for that season and every store and brand would toe the same line. But, there are exceptions, and corduroy is having a good stab at bringing itself back.

Lead by Prada, corduroy, in all its brushed softness, is perfect when coming in the reds and rusts of autumn. A tactile fabric, corduroy is hardwearing and can flit between casual and smart in all its bookish charm.

I love the fact the Germans called corduroy “Manchester” which was the home of “Cottonopolis” and a major manufacturer of corduroy for many years.

Left - Prada Menswear AW17

Corduroy can add bulk so be carefully when choosing a shape or style. For something cooler and more casual look for jeans jackets with matching trousers. I really like what the Spanish brand Lois are doing.

Below - Good News - Rhubarb Tan High - £60

Best Men's Corduroy Good News Trainers Sneakers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best Men's Corduroy Lois Jeans JacketBest Men's Corduroy Lois JeansLeft - Lois Jeans - Jumbo Cord Brown Corduroy Jacket - £95, Dallas Jumbo Brown Corduroy Trousers - £65 from Stuarts London

Below - Vetements - Darted-Knee Cotton-Corduroy Trousers - £1200 from matchesfashion.com

Best Men's Corduroy Vetements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best Men's Corduroy Drake's JacketBest Men's Corduroy Drake's TrousersLeft - Drake’s - Single-Breasted Green Cotton Cord Jacket - £595, Green Cotton Cord Suit Trousers - £255

Below - Junya Watanabe - Cotton-Corduroy Baseball Cap - £130 from matchesfashion.com

Best Men's Corduroy Junya Watanabe Cap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best Men's Corduroy PradaLeft- Prada - Slim-Fit Leather-Trimmed Cotton-Corduroy Suit Jacket - £1805 from MRPORTER.COM

Best Men's Corduroy Jigsaw shirtLeft - Jigsaw - Garment Dye Corduroy Button Down Shirt - £79

Below - ASOS - Tapered Cord Trousers In Rust - £30

Best Men's Corduroy Asos

Best Men's Corduroy Marks Spencer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left - Marks & Spencer - Straight Fit Corduroy Trousers With Stretch - £35

Published in Fashion