Tuesday, 11 July 2017 17:44

Trend Tissue Paper Logomania

Menswear trend tissue paper logos bally

Not all logos are created equal and one that is hot one minute, can quickly, for various reasons, become fashion deadly nightshade. Fashion goes through waves of logomania and then decides it's over, done that and goes subtle and that usually lasts about two minutes with most brands when they see sales falling.

Menswear trend tissue paper logos Palm AngelsAnyway, the hot logo for AW17 and SS18 is the full name running diagonally across. Think of a branded piece of tissue paper and you get the idea.

When Balenciaga relaunched under new designer Demna Gvasalia the website was given a tasteful tasteless makeover with the name 'Balenciaga Paris' running diagonally across. It then made its way onto clothes and accessories.

I'm not sure how long this is going to last, but, right now, it's cool.

Far Left - Bally SS18

Left - Palm Angels SS18

Below - Balenciaga SS18

Menswear trend tissue paper logos balenciaga

Menswear trend tissue paper logos msgm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left - MSGM SS18

Below - Balenciaga - Intarsia Wool-Blend Scarf - £365 from MRPORTER.COM

 

Menswear trend tissue paper logos bally

Published in Fashion

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Rochas

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

The Crystal Maze Jumpsuit

The all-in-one becomes a style adventure as the jumpsuit, finally, makes into men's wardrobes. Think of it as a cost saver, as you get a top and bottom in one.

From Left - Rochas, Prada, Prada, Lanvin,

Below - From Left - Ralph Lauren, Facetasm, Ami, Cerruti1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Ralph LaurenMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada Cerruti 1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Collars

The shirt is back! -you heard it here first - so that also means the collar is too. Wear it messy and open.

From Left - Prada, Marni, Wooyoungmi, Valentino

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Name Badges

This trend followed on from London - here

Left - Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaThe Soviet Shoulder

Forget the Cold War, it's all about the cold shoulder for SS18. Think big and high. More hunched than hench!

From Left - Prada, Thom Browne,  Rick Owens, Paul Smith

Below Left - Balenciaga, Wooyoungmi, Dries van Noten

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Return of the Tie

We've seen the shirt - above - is back, so it only seems fitting that the neck tie makes a reappearance.

From Left - Marni, Marni, Kenzo, SSS World Corp

From Below - Paul Smith, Wooyoungmi, Fendi, Antonio Marras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Clashing

The less it matches the better.

Left - Marni, Sacai

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical Stripes

They make you taller & thinner? Where do I sign?!

Left - Marni, Balmain, Etudes, Haider Ackermann

Below Left - Paul Smith, Cerruti 1881, Ami

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Long Shirt

Long & loose. Just don't call it 'long-line'!

From Left - Thom Browne, Alexander McQueen, Dries van Noten, Officine Generale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

HyperFlorals

Florals on Mephedrone!

Below - Kenzo, Ami, DSquared2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Long Short Sleeves

It's all part of the larger-than-life, oversized trend of trying to make your polo shirt sleeves touch your wrists.

From Left - Balenciaga, Balenciaga, DSquared2, MSGM, Neil Barrett

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

Published in Fashion
Tuesday, 27 June 2017 12:17

Trend It's A Wrap!

Menswear Trends Balenciaga Spring SS18

Menswear Trends Balenciaga Spring SS18

Menswear Trends Balenciaga Spring SS18Straight from the dry cleaners, the trend for boxfresh, cellophane wrapped and pristine fashion hit its zenith at the recent Paris shows. 

Make like your granny's sofa and add a clear coat for SS18. Perfect for public transport!

From Left - Balenciaga SS18, Ports 1961 Resort 2018, Balenciaga SS18

Published in Fashion

The first ever UK exhibition on the Spanish fashion designer, Cristóbal Balenciaga, and his continuing influence on modern fashion opens at the V&A. The exhibition marks the centenary of the opening of Balenciaga’s first fashion house in San Sebastian, Spain and the 80th anniversary of the opening of his famous fashion house in Paris. 

Left - The man himself, Cristóbal Balenciaga

TheChicGeek says, “While I love the V&A’s Fashion Gallery, the big exhibition space, where Pink Floyd currently is, is usually larger and something to get more excited about. But, this exhibition feels less cramped than previous exhibitions in the space - see Underwear here - and upstairs has a nice, spacious flow.

Balenciaga, as a designer, was serious. Those black voluminous gowns seem to sum up his lack of fun. He feels strict in that Spanish Catholic way, manifesting itself in his designs using lace and the Spanish Mantilla. You don’t get much feel for the man or his personality, but I think that’s how he liked it. He only gave one interview in his life, and that was just before he died.

Left - Known for his elegant volumes, Balenciaga was one of the great couturiers of the 20th century

The name disappeared into the history books when he closed his house and only came back into common culture with its revival around 20 year's ago when Gucci’s parent company, Kering, bought it alongside Stella McCartney and Alexander McQueen.

Downstairs is a collection of pieces, mostly coats and dresses, from his most prolific period the 1960s. These are sculptural clothes for pictures and striking as they are, when they become practical, to enter the real world, particularly the commissions by the rich Americans, they look dated and frumpy. His volumes work on their own, but on people they add bulk and often swallow the wearer. These aren't easy wearing pieces.

Some of his pieces aren’t practical either. The wearer couldn’t sit down or go to the toilet in 'Envelope' dress, for example, but this doesn't detract from its beauty.

This was the golden age of 20th century of couture and while he produced ready-to-wear with his 'Eisa' range, his heart was in his exacting standards and the fine fabrics he used. 

Left - The 'Envelope' dress, 1967, a design you couldn't sit down or go to the toilet in

Balenciaga is more a collection of one-off greatest hits than themed seasons in the vain of Saint Laurent. These weren’t particularly well documented, even though they were huge, between 150 to 200 looks, as the press weren’t allowed into his shows, so the main imagery is striking black and white shoots in the magazines at the time which have entered in the common psyche of 20th century fashion images.

Upstairs is a large display with a varied selection of designers, both old and new, paying homage to the volumes that Balenciaga pioneered. There are a couple of men’s pieces by JW Anderson and Rory Parnell-Mooney to illustrate that his influence isn’t restricted solely to womenswear.

Left - JW Anderson paying homage to Balenciaga with his tulip trousers

There are a couple of pieces from the new Balenciaga, under Demna Gvasalia, who is producing great things and referencing the house while making it feel contemporary. Unfortunately, there isn't a blue Ikea bag in sight!

Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion until 18th February 2018. Admission £12

Published in Fashion

screaming chic geek paul smith menswear SS17To call it a recession is maybe a little extreme, but let’s call it a contraction. Menswear is struggling. Some are mouthing the word #brexit but this was coming way before that and affecting international markets too, most notably America.

Like everything that goes in cycles, you have your ups and you have your downs. We’re definitely in a down cycle as brands merge their men’s and women’s and reduce the amount of labels within their brands.

Left - Inside menswear is screaming

Many are private companies so they don’t disclose profits, but when you have menswear giants like Armani and Ralph Lauren losing labels - Collezioni and Armani Jeans in the case of Armani and store closures - in the case of Ralph Lauren - then things are clearly unsustainable.

Why is this happening? The first big answer is a saturated market. Do we need much more ‘stuff’? When Ikea’s head of sustainability, Steve Howard, said we’d reached “peak stuff”, he hit the nail on the head. We’ve seen expansion online and offline and our wardrobes are bursting with clothes at every price point.

Designer fashion isn’t coming up with many new ideas and this has lead to the high-street bringing the new ideas and offering improved quality that many men are happy with. I think companies like ASOS are doing well because people are trading down to cheaper and more fun fashion and don't really wear it long enough to care about the quality.

Brands like Topman have got more and more expensive and are not reactive enough to trends and the latest gimmicks and fashions. They’ve believed in their own ‘cool’ which is dangerous for any brand. Arcadia, Topman’s parent company, has seen many high profile departures lately. Craig McGregor left his role as retail director at Topshop/Topman, after eight years, and Topshop/Topman global commercial director Matt Brewster is leaving the company. Wesley Taylor left his role as managing director of Burton and Yasmin Yusuf left as creative director of Miss Selfridge, both after more than 10 years at the business. Which all suggests the epic growth Arcadia has experienced over the last few decades has now ground to a halt. They are no longer the darling of the British high-street.

Another reason for the men’s downturn is competition is fierce and this had lead to a discount environment. People know they can wait for the sale or search the internet for a discount code. This makes margins smaller for companies which then need to sell even larger volumes. We’ve also seen growth in companies like TK Maxx that offer people the brands they want, but with heavy discounts.

Fashion has changed too. It’s very sportswear/dress down driven. These are cheap or old clothes. Looking ‘expensive’ has gone out of fashion. Brands like Balenciaga and Gosha Rubchinskiy have pioneered this style of fugly fashion and while not cheap they have prices that are more realistic and attainable.

Millennials are all about ‘experiences’ and are less materialistic, or so we’re are told. All those selfies tell a different story, but I think they want to eat out and wear something new, which ultimately means spending less. This big group of young consumers is squeezed by rents, student loans and low wages and this isn’t going to change for the foreseeable future.

In the Evening Standard on Monday, Net-a-Porter/Mr Porter boss, Alison Loehnis, said when they measured “zeitgeist buying” in the Mr Porter team they discovered the number one item was socks. “Followed by Ray-Bans and trainers.” Socks?!! Now, that is worrying. Unless Mr Porter is selling hundreds of millions of dollars worth of socks, which I doubt, then it’s a signifier of the market. It’s too expensive and they are the cheapest things they sell. It’s also one of the main gifting items and something you don’t need to try on.

Online is still only 10% of the retail market so has huge potential, but that still means 9 in every 10 pounds is spent on the high street.

Net-a-Porter/Mr Porter call their top customers ‘EIPs’, (EXTREMELY IMPORTANT PERSON) and these EIPs are the two per cent of customers who account for 40 per cent of NAP revenue. It’s dangerous to have all your eggs in a few baskets, particularly a fickle customer which many others are chasing. They’re now offering a service where the driver waits while these EIPs try things on. It’s a gimmick, but at least it shows they’re trying. These EIPS are the people shopping in Selfridges and Harrods too, while the rest of us have seen our wage packets shrink or not go as far and designer prices continue to rise. #Brexit will make imports to the UK more expensive, temporarily, but fashion will just find somewhere cheaper to make it, but it’s true the weakest wont survive this price hike or margin cut. 

Brands have been trimming the fat over the last few years and many are down to the bare bones. The recent christmas was good for retailers and I think that kept many afloat, for now.

Jaeger just announced its bankruptcy. I don’t think there’s much hope for it to survive as it is, but it’ll become a brand within Edinburgh Woollen Mill or the like. It’s the sign of the times and also the cycle of brands. There are times when a brand runs its course and no matter how much investment or time, it’s just time to let it go.

Okay, enough doom and gloom. On a positive note from a down you have an up and when a gap appears something new will come into fill it. But, our addiction to cheap clothes isn’t going anywhere which will make it very difficult for new, smaller brands or labels to compete. I think short term we’ll see more closures and less choice or a choice masked by the fact it’s a sub brand from a big retailer. H&M is just about to launch Arket.

One thing is for sure, fashion is unpredictable and that’s why I love it.

Published in Fashion

Balenciaga menswear The Chic Geek short sleeve shirtFashion always surprises and reinterprets. We all have our preconceptions about things and it’s that willingness to change that separates the leaders from the followers. I love it when something you think couldn’t be less cool is presented in a new way that makes it desirable. This is what good designers do.

short sleeve shirt Balenciaga Matches The Chic GeekFar LeftBalenciaga SS17, Left - Striped Cotton-Poplin Cropped Shirt - £285 from Matchesfashion.com

When Georgian designer, Demna Gvasalia, of Vetements fame, started working as Creative Director of Balenciaga, I was a bit sceptical. I thought they - the parent company Kering - were chasing the latest cool wave and it was more about column inches and gimmicks than making great clothes. I’ll put my hands up and say I was wrong and they are making interesting clothes at more realistic prices. It’s also the first time that new designers have brought in some of the DNA of the house into the present.

What he has done is play with proportions and shapes, that at first sight seem comedic, but when they start to sink in become desirable and cool. It feels fresh, which brings me to the easiest way to buy into this collection. 

Fashion has got basic, and that’s basic as in #basicbitch. Items you wouldn’t have given a second thought are now at the forefront of menswear thanks to Demna Gvasalia at Balenciaga.

Long the wardrobe of the postman or the office dad, the short sleeve shirt, slightly oversized, is the style you should Blue men's short sleeve shirt Espritbe going for. You want those nerdy triangular sleeves, this isn’t a gun show, and I would team with a pair of tailored sweat pants to stop it looking too dress-down office.

You can opt for the original or find a standard short sleeved shirt in most men’s shops like this like blue version from Esprit.

Left - Esprit - Poplin Shirt With Short Sleeves - £29 

 

Published in Fashion

Givenchy menswear Clare Waight KellerFrench fashion house, Givenchy, has a new Creative Director. British designer, Clare Waight Keller, was announced as Riccardo Tisci’s replacement last week. 

I remember her at Pringle of Scotland, but because of the way the company was run, and never really made any of the interesting pieces, it was hard to judge her menswear. She then went to Chloe, and while I look at womenswear, there wasn’t much noise or attention so I didn't really pay much attention. But, she seems like a good caretaker, at the very least.

Right - Who-bert? Hubert de Givenchy outside his chateau

While not a revolutionary appointment, I think, they - Givenchy (LVMH) , obviously, want to re-feminise the brand, most probably targeted at the women's accessories. Tisci’s aesthetic was severe, harsh and a masculine form of sexuality which probably didn’t resonate with that many women or the type of women Givenchy see as their customer. Kim K, anyone?!

I remember being told that he wasn’t under contract to use Givenchy beauty products in his shows which seems ridiculous when this is the cash cow of the business. There was also a disconnect between the fashion and the beauty side.

The menswear pioneered that designer-sweatshirt-with-a-seasonal-image look and the slide of high-fashion into sportswear. When it was good, it was good, and the menswear had never been on the radar before. Remember when Ozwald Boateng was there for a while?!! Those £500 sweatshirts were jumping off the rails. 

So, this leads me to the new menswear, which, excitingly, I don't know what to expect. The first season must be SS18, to be shown in Paris in June. Givenchy is a strange brand in that it has a very strong name, but it is not matched with any identity or imagery. The majority of people wouldn't know who Hubert de Givenchy was from a line-up - Who-bert de Givenchy?! and, apart from Audrey Hepburn, many people wouldn’t know a single item of clothing.

So, what should they do? Well, look at Balenciaga. While a newer ‘old’ brand than Givenchy, this is the first time, under Demna Gvasalia, that its archive has been referenced, but in a way that isn’t backward looking. There’s a link which makes sense when you’re buying a historical name. You want that DNA to move forward and make the label mean something. It gives it a certain weight and grounding yet far from 'archive'.

Givenchy menswear doesn’t really have anything direct to reference, but that’s the exciting part. There must be plenty in the archive to inspire and bring forward and refresh that we don't know about. Givenchy should look back to look forward. It should also ask the new creative director to oversee all aspects of the business and maybe use the odd lipstick in her show. 

Published in Fashion
Tuesday, 03 January 2017 10:35

How To Wear A Parka 2017

How to wear a parka 2017 Raf SimonsOversized parka Balenciaga The Chic GeekIt's always this side of winter that the parka comes into its own. The default sub-zero style, the parka has become the trusted companion to many a fashionisto. But, there's a new way to wear it:

Go big and don't go home! There’s oversized and then there’s oversized and the designers, this season, have really blown-up the parka. Wear it big, wear it slouchy and if anybody asks, say "Demna made it for me!".

If you can't afford a Raf Simons, buy a generously filled high-street version a couple of sizes bigger. You can thank me later.

Left - Raf Simons - Men’s Oversized Down Quilted Jacket In Black & Yellow From LN-CC
Right - Balenciaga FW16

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Oversized parka London fishtail The Chic GeekLeft - Parka London - ‘Lever’ Oversized Fishtail Parka

Canada Goose parka Vetements how to wear The Chic GeekLeft - Vetements - Red Canada Goose Edition Down Parka From SSense

Published in How To
Friday, 02 December 2016 16:17

ChicGeek Men’s Lurex Partywear 2016

Menswear Lurex Knitwear Polo JosephFirst things first, what exactly is Lurex? Lurex is a type of yarn or fabric which incorporates a glittering metallic thread. It gives the knit a sort of Christmasy makeover which is on just the right side of glittery.

It’s perfect for this time of year, under artificial lights or candles, and adds an element of reflective fun to a suit or evening wear.

I remember Prada produced a collection with lots of lurex in AW 2011 , below, and showed how it could look fresh and interesting in knitwear and accessories. I ended up buying a knitted tie. Lurex on men shows an element of confidence in the wearer and somebody you instantly gravitate to at a party. Get involved!

Here is a selection of what is available this season: 

Prada lurex AW 2011 menswearFar Left - Joseph - Lurex Merinos Polo - £195

Left - Vintage - Prada AW 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lurex ASOS menswear ChristmasLeft - ASOS - Knitted Metallic T-Shirt - £25

tank top gucci lurex menswearLeft - Gucci - Lurex Jacquard Tank Top - £440 from LN-CC

Below - Balenciaga - Men’s Slip-on Lurex - £325

Balenciaga lurex trainers sneakers

AMI knitwear lurex menswear style bloggerLeft - AMI - Men’s Round Neck Pull In Lurex - £235

Topman lurex knitwear 2016 the chic geekLeft - Topman - Lurex Top - £20

 

Published in Fashion

Coach Regent Street Dinosaur RexyYou walk into the new Coach store on Regent Street and the first thing to confront you is Rexy, Coach’s T-Rex dinosaur. This isn’t the replacement for Dippy the Diplodocus, the Natural History Museum’s famous dinosaur, which is going on a regional tour, but it’s just as magnetic.

Left - Putting the sexy into Rexy!

The new store is impressive. It feels like a one-off. Coach has always been a perfectly acceptable, mid-market and luxury with a small l, brand. 

moving handbags coach regent streetRight - The handbags move around the Heath Robinson-type contraption

But, with this new store they’ve really stepped it up a gear. It shows a Creative Director - Stuart Vevers - putting himself into the brand and being allowed to do so. What they’ve done is thought about injecting personality and identity rather than focus solely on ‘luxury’. 
So many brands get fixated on luxury and forget about identity and personality. For some, it’s all about the Carrara marble and shiny finishes and they’ve started to look soulless, empty and, ultimately, boring. 

Rexy The Dinosaur Coach bags Regent Street

Left - Coach Regent Street's giant Rexy is going to be auctioned off

The new Coach store has a mechanical track with bags running along it, a giant pink neon dinosaur in the window and special product, downstairs, designed with British tourist badges and travel souvenir symbols. It’s fun without being gimmicky. It feels like somebody has thought about it rather than simply rolling out a format the world over. Yawn.

In contrast, I popped into the new handbag hall in Selfridges. The biggest in the world, when finished, it has all the usual suspects: Valentino, Celine, Balenciaga, Chanel, Burberry, all with their signature shop-fits. It all feels so predictable and formulaic. The only one of interest was Gucci with a mosaic floor featuring their, now, signature wasps. 

Luxury needs personality. It needs a strong individual to lead with instinct and intuition. Brands need to create newness and not just consistency. Coach seems to not only made Rexy sexy, but also fun. It's approachable and welcoming. If brands are going to get us off our sofas, offline and outside, there needs to be something worthy of going out for. 

Published in Fashion
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