Tuesday, 12 June 2018 21:32

LFWM Spring 2019 HighLights Day 3

LFWM London Fashion Week Men's Menswear Arket Suit

STEFAN COOKELFWM London Fashion Week Men's Menswear Pretty Green Stripey Suit

Part of the Topman sponsored ‘MAN’ show, Stefan Cooke, in his second outing here, went from his super-tight, Gaultier style AW18 season to something, while still fitted, that played with hype-colour tartans, half ruffs on the necks and small mirrors dotted randomly across the pieces. Winner of the H&M designer prize in 2017, Cooke, from the UK, is a designer to continue watching.

BETHANY WILLIAMS

Part of the BFC showrooms and also with a presentation at Charing Cross Library, Bethany Williams took inspiration from all those books and book binding and managed to thread real, physical paperbacks into her SS19 collection. Working with The Quaker Mobile Library, which lend books to people with no fixed address, her collection showed the hand-ons, painstaking craft element to fashion.

ALEX MULLINS

Mullins is on a roll. His AW18 collection was one of the best of the season and, this, the new SS19, had plenty of ideas to keep you wanting more. Standouts include rock shaped portfolio bags and asymmetric slashed shirts showing just a glimpse of the shoulder. 2019, the year of the male shoulder, maybe?!

Day - What Did TheChicGeek wear? Credits - Suit - Arket, T-Shirt - Oiboy, Cap - Arc'Teryx, Sunglasses - Illesteva

BERTHOLD

If expensive looking black bin bags are your thing, then Berthold could be the place to look. I’m just joking, but the fascination with anything black and shiny seems to be taking hold within menswear and Raimund Berthold is running with it. He showed plenty for AW18 and, now, this was the summer version. Think parachute light black coats and matching accessorises in a sport-luxe - there, I said it! - collection for those who like fashion as uniform.

MARTINE ROSE

Martine Rose took us to Norf London, St Leonards Square in NW5 to be exact, which looked perfect for street parties and carnivals. This was working class Victorian square with no fancy greenery in the middle, no even Albert Square sized. 

The catwalk was the road and the neighbours looked on, perched on their front garden walls or down quizzically from an upstairs window while doing the tea-time washing up.

This was the show of the week for a designer that waited for fashion to come to them. Now, with her own label and working on Balenciaga’s menswear, Rose has become a chief exponent of fashion’s obsession with bad taste. 

There was plenty here, but it’s done in a way that’s still desirable. How much it has left to run is anybody’s guess, but I don’t think the retailers are getting bored. I saw a new ‘hybrid’ - because we all love one of those -  a half-jean, half-trackie trouser - rodeo at the front, scally at the back! 

Rose’s 90s ‘Geezer’ was going out, out; clear plastic trousers, squared-toed snakeskin chain loafers with no backs and Motorcross trousers with loud taping will definitely get you noticed.  This was ‘Out-On-The-Tann’ man, probably down to his local boozer, looking to impress and living it up with gold chains, tucked in shirts and smart-ish shoes. I still want in.

Evening - What Did TheChicGeek wear? Credits - Suit - Pretty Green, Shirt - ASOS, Sunglasses - Kaleos, Shoes - Vintage Alexander McQueen

See LFWM Day 1 - here

See LFWM Day 2 - here

Published in Fashion
Tuesday, 29 May 2018 21:58

Film McQueen

Is the fashion documentary replacing the book Alexander McQueen filmIt would be hard for a documentary about Alexander McQueen not to be good. His talent was such that, twenty year’s later, the clothes and production can still hold their own against anything produced since.

I can remember watching CNN Style with Elsa Klensch - fashion, beauty and decorating! - this was the 90s remember: no internet and hardly any fashion on TV or in the media - when the ’13’ show with Shalom Harlow being sprayed by the robots was shown and I can remember looking at the TV and feeling the energy through the television. This was fashion as performance, as art, yet relatable and totally modern and contemporary. It opened my eyes and raised the bar.

This documentary is much more personal than the sell-out exhibitions at the Met and, subsequently, at the V&A, and that’s the joy of fashion documentaries - read #ChicGeekComment Is ‘Peak Fashion Documentary’ Killing The Fashion Tome?

The ‘brand’ doesn’t dominate and this is McQueen’s life story split into different sections while highlighting specific shows. His family features heavily - his sister and his nephew - who talk open and honestly about McQueen and things that shaped him, affected him and motivated him.

It was interesting to be reminded of the raw yobbishness of 90s McQueen. The Burberry check shirts, the gold necklaces and the complete lack of self image. For somebody with such good taste in designing and cutting clothes, it never really moved onto him or around him He didn’t seem interested in dressing the part or living that kind of life surrounding by beautiful things and I think this is where Isabella Blow came in. She was everything he wasn’t: obsessed with how she looked, aristocratic, living surrounded by antiques and beautiful heirlooms in her country house.  

Opposites attracted, but they had an affinity with their darker sides. Both committed suicide and would use their creativity as a mask as well as a crutch.

This documentary is intense and it’s comprehensive - about 95 minutes - I think by the time it hits Netflix I would split it into 2 episodes. People like looking forward to watching a second instalment.

What Alexander McQueen had was not only imagination, but the technical skills to make clothes worth spending money on. As Tom Ford says in the film, when the theatrics and show-pieces were stripped back what was left on the hanger was some of the best cut and more stylish clothes ever.

Eight years after his death we’re still just as fascinated by his life and his place in the fashion history books alongside people like Yves Saint Laurent and Balenciaga is assured. It’s just a shame his career wasn’t as long, because, being selfish, I wanted so much more.

Published in Fashion

Is the fashion documentary replacing the book Alexander McQueen film

When I saw an article advertising a new fashion documentary on André Leon Talley I knew we’d reached 'peak fashion documentary' territory. The larger-than-life (in-life?) American Vogue editor-at-large has a film called “The Gospel According To André” coming out in May. 

Left - The new Alexander McQueen documentary by Embankment Films Read TheChicGeek Review - here

It charts his humble beginnings growing up in North Carolina to being one of America’s most well known fashion characters.

He just adds to the many designers, brands and egos who have released documentaries over the last few years. We all know how the treatment goes: a new designer diarising their first ‘crucial’ collection, a celebration of an eccentric fashion ‘icon’ or a big opening or event and the drama surrounding it. It’s all played out in the 90 minutes or so of devoted film. Done.

It’s all very watchable content, even for those who wouldn’t know their Simone Rocha from their Ferrero Rocher. Most recently we’ve had Westwood, Blahnik and Noten get the fash-doc once over, and with a new McQueen one on it’s way, the output shows no signs of slowing down. 

"Fashion has become something of an entertainment industry, and the fashion doco' is an effective way of educating an audience keen on learning about the fashion industry's players, its big brands and the myths that surround them. Expect a lot more,” says Jamie Huckbody, European Editor for Harper's BAZAAR Australia.

Netflix and the like needs content and fashion is a truly visual medium with many can’t-make-them-up type characters perfectly cast in their Devil Wears Prada roles. 

I wanted to write something about the rise of the fash-doc and its growth for while, but it was a visit to the London Book Fair that got me thinking about the reason why we’ve hit peak fashion documentary.

It’s basically replaced the fashion book for the younger generation.

Is the fashion documentary replacing the book Andre Leon Talley Film

There are definitely less fashion monographs being produced on brands and designers ATM. Large, definitive books just don’t seem as cool anymore, and feel almost dead in comparison to the documentary.

There’s also been a generational shift. Under the elegant expanse of Olympia, I looked at all these books and I thought, who is buying them? It’s the older, wealthier generations. The ones who have the luxury of time, money and space.

Right - The Gospel According To André, coming out in May

‘Generation Rent’ - younger people - aren’t buying these books anymore. Even if they could afford them, they’ve got nowhere to store them and they certainly don’t want the additional baggage of cart shelves of expensive books around every time they move. They often don’t even have enough room for the coffee table, let alone the door stopper books to go on it.

Why buy a weighty and expensive Taschen or Assouline when you can watch the documentary? You’re only going to look at the book once, anyway, most probably. You can stream a video anytime you like, plus we are all so used to consuming content in this way.

Huckbody disagrees, saying “"Over the past three years, I've been working very closely with the millennial generation as a university lecturer, and there is still a huge appetite for books; especially books that offer an insight into 'other worlds'. This might be anything from the black and white photography of Karlheinz Weinberger to the books that are published alongside fashion exhibitions such as the Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty book. For a lot of 'Generation Rent', the book offers a different experience to a picture glanced momentarily on social media." 

I agree that social media is a very quick, disposable and, sometimes, unsatisfactory medium for fashion history and I’m not going to go to the extreme and pronounce the book dead, (just yet!), I’m just saying the fashion documentary has proven massively popular and it’s a modern case of you've bought the designer T-shirt now watch the documentary on it.

Traditional forms of consuming information are changing and adapting and the fashion book was always ripe to be replaced by film. Film can illustrate movement, show catwalks, people and really gives consumers a feel for what they are seeing. Add the music of the time, interviews and you get a 360 view, albeit one the brand or designer wants you to see, but then, hey, books can be just as commissioned or narcissistic.

Not all films meet with the subject’s approval. We recently saw Westwood fall out with the makers of her documentary and encourage people not to see it. It had the opposite effect, gave it more exposure and we all know that it’s good for her anarchic image.

Some of these documentaries won’t do its subjects justice, others will surprise you with how interesting they actually are.  

What is great is, by replacing the book, fashion has got a much larger audience. It would have been a select, passionate few buying these books originally, but now everybody has access to give the documentary the first 10 mins and see if it piques their interest enough to watch it until the end.

What do you think? Tell me on social media @thechicgeekcouk

Talking of fashion documentaries, TheChicGeek just reviewed Antonio Lopez: Sex, Fashion & Disco 

Read more expert ChicGeek Comments - here

Published in Fashion
Monday, 12 March 2018 16:38

Chic Geek Comment The Couture Rut

Death of couture Hubert de Givenchy

As another couturier passes away - Hubert de Givenchy - I wanted to write a piece I’ve been thinking about for a while. With only Lagerfeld and Valentino left, men who have touched or worked with the great couturiers of the 20th century, is it time to leave couture behind? 

It feels like couture is out of touch with today. This isn’t about the vast sums of money it costs,  even though that is a good point, it’s more about the creative rut that many couture houses have found themselves in. 

Left - Hubert & Audrey

It used to be an area for experimentation and fantasy - remember Galliano’s Diorient Express at Dior and all the models dressed like Henry VIII or a Native American chiefs arriving by steam train? - rather than pretty clothes for people with more money than they know what to do with.

You only have to look at ‘Red Carpet’ dressing to see the state of couture. It’s dull. It’s boring. It’s safe. Of course, it’s beautifully made, but what exactly is couture adding to ‘fashion’? 

The Oscars used to have a few fashion ‘moments’ worth staying up for, but it became a battlefield of money and sponsorship, but also, with a few rare exceptions, people more interested in their own vanity and safety off the worst dressed lists. Many of these people aren’t sophisticated enough to wear something challenging or directional.

Couture needs a starting point of anything goes. It should be about experimentation and wowing people with technical skills and craft. I know it needs a commercial element, but it’s never going to be a big seller. In its nature it needs to keep the numbers low, otherwise, what else are you paying for?

There are enough ‘dress-makers’ or newer brands like Ralph & Russo for the pretty dress crowd. Brands need to think what it brings to their image and whether it’s relevant going into the 21st century.

When Hedi Slimane was announced as the new Creative Director of Céline, it was also announced he would be doing couture. Really? A house that has never done couture before, does the world need anymore? This is more a case of massaging an ego than bringing anything new. It’ll just be a higher price point of the same things, like what he did at YSL.

Gucci is a brand which would be worth doing as couture because many of the ideas can’t be manufactured to the quality you’d expect of the design. Couture would take the pressure and lid off this and allow the designs to be as good as they should be.

I agree with keeping skills alive and I, wholeheartedly, believe in craft, but couture just doesn’t have the energy it once had. Couture should be a showplace of experimentation rather than a branding exercise to continually pump out the same thing. 

I think couture is currently a reflection of the current lack of great designers. Sadly, without more McQueens coming along it will just be more variations of the same beautifully made things.

Published in Fashion
Wednesday, 21 February 2018 17:38

Menswear Trends AW18 Paris Chic Geek Scrapbook

Paris men's is the home of the big fashion hitters and it didn't disappoint for AW18:

AW18 menswear trends Paris dunhill leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris paul smith leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris Hermes leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris paul smith leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris Ami leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris Wooyoungmi leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris Cerruti leather trousers business

AW18 menswear trends Paris Louis Vuitton leather trousers business

Business Leather

Thought leather trousers were just for the Hoff?! Think again. Leather shakes off its stereotypical rockstar image and gets smart enough for business attire.

From Far - Dunhill, Paul Smith, Hermès, Berluti, Ami, Wooyoungmi, Cerruti, Louis Vuitton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris chubby dunhill

Chubby Shine

Once the sole preserve of Moncler wearing European language students, the ultra shiny puffer is the future of cold weather jackets.

Left - Dunhill

AW18 menswear trends Paris Kenzo triple layers

AW18 menswear trends Paris Kenzo triple layers

Triple Layers

Why have one boring layer when you can have three colourful layers all showing at the same time? Rollneck, polo shirt and tank. Tick, tick, tick!

Both - Kenzo

Male Floral Twinsets

If you're going to wear a twinset, it may as well be covered with flowers.

Below - Both Kenzo

AW18 menswear trends Paris male twinset Kenzo floral

AW18 menswear trends Paris male twinset Kenzo floral

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris dunhill silver accessorises bag

AW18 menswear trends Paris Kenzo silver accessorises bag

AW18 menswear trends Paris Lanvin silver accessorises bag

AW18 menswear trends Paris Louis Vuittom silver accessorises bag

Silver Accessorises

This is the season for  reflection with silver accessorises. From bags to boots, choose something you can see yourself in, literally. 

From Far Left - Dunhill, Kenzo, Lanvin, Louis Vuitton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris Kenzo Fun Fur Coat

AW18 menswear trends Paris Fun Fur Pigalle

AW18 menswear trends Paris Fun Fur Sacai

AW18 menswear trends Paris Kenzo Fun Fur Coat

Fun Fur

No animals were harmed in the making of these. It’s not supposed to real or fake, but fun.

From Far Left - Kenzo, Pigalle, Sacai, Kenzo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris Kenzo box jacket

AW18 menswear trends Paris Wooyoungmi boxy jacket

Box Jackets

Big shoulders and longer jackets continues to push the tailoring boundaries.

From Left - Kenzo, Wooyoungmi

Magic Marble

Look like walking Matchesfashion.com packaging!

From Left - Louis Vuitton, Dries van Noten

AW18 menswear trends Paris Louis Vuitton Marble Effect

AW18 menswear trends Paris Dries van Noten Marble EffectAW18 menswear trends Paris Dries van Noten Marble Effect

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Accent

Yves Klein blue is the bold, primary accent colour of the season.

Below - Officine Generale, Hermes, Acne, Facetasm

AW18 menswear trends Paris blue Officine Creative

AW18 menswear trends Paris blue Hermes

AW18 menswear trends Paris blue Acne

AW18 menswear trends Paris blue Facetasm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris Paul Smith Petrol Blue

AW18 menswear trends Paris Facetasm Petrol Blue

AW18 menswear trends Paris Paul Smith Petrol Blue

Petrol Blue

The AW18 colour of the season.

From Left - Paul Smith, Facetasm, Paul Smith

AW18 menswear trends Boxer Shorts SSS World Corp

Boxer Waisted Short

A true boxer worn high over the hips.

Left - SSS World Corp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shiny Bottoms

PVC, trust me, is the material and finish of the season. Black bin bag? Yes, please!

From Far Left - Balmain, Acne, Wooyoungmi, Louis Vuitton, CMMN SWDN, Haider Ackermann, Walter van Beirendonck, GMBH

AW18 menswear trends Paris Balmain PVC

AW18 menswear trends Paris PVC shiny menswear acne

AW18 menswear trends Paris Wooyoungmi PVC

AW18 menswear trends Paris Louis Vuitton PVC

AW18 menswear trends Paris CMN SWDN PVC

AW18 menswear trends Paris Haider Ackermann PVC

AW18 menswear trends Paris Walter van Beirendonck PVC

AW18 menswear trends Paris Gmbh PVC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris Dior Homme denim AW18 menswear trends Paris Vetements denimAW18 menswear trends Paris Dior Homme denimAW18 menswear trends Paris Dior Homme denimAW18 menswear trends Paris Cerruti denimAW18 menswear trends Paris Louis Vuitton denimAW18 menswear trends Paris Dior Homme denimAW18 menswear trends Paris denimAW18 menswear trends Paris Dior Homme denim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Jean

The worst wash, in the worst cut. Hello, new jean.

From Far Left - Dior Homme, Vetements, Vetements, Wooyoungmi, Cerruti, Louis Vuitton, Facetasm, GMBH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris Hermes sceneAW18 menswear trends Paris Hermes scene

Landscape Poster Knits

JW Anderson may have done this first, but I still like it.

Both - Hermes

AW18 menswear trends Paris Alexander McQueen Game of Thrones coat

Game of Thrones Coats

Jon Snow way?! Look like a warrior

Left - Alexander McQueen

Clear Thinking 

This is granny mac territory, and I love it!

Below both - Maison Margeila

AW18 menswear trends Paris Maison Margiela Inside OutAW18 menswear trends Paris Maison Margiela Inside Out

 

 

AW18 menswear trends Paris Vetements Inside Out

AW18 menswear trends Paris Maison Margiela Inside Out

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside Out

Don't over think this. Just turn your coat inside out. 

From Left - Vetements, Maison Margiela 

Leg Warmers

Weak calves?! This could be your winter leg solution.

Below - All Thom Browne

See TheChicGeek's New York AW18 Scrapbook

AW18 menswear trends Paris Thom Browne Leg WarmersAW18 menswear trends Paris Thom Browne Leg WarmersAW18 menswear trends Paris Thom Browne Leg Warmers

 

Published in Fashion

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Rochas

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

The Crystal Maze Jumpsuit

The all-in-one becomes a style adventure as the jumpsuit, finally, makes into men's wardrobes. Think of it as a cost saver, as you get a top and bottom in one.

From Left - Rochas, Prada, Prada, Lanvin,

Below - From Left - Ralph Lauren, Facetasm, Ami, Cerruti1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Ralph LaurenMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada Cerruti 1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Collars

The shirt is back! -you heard it here first - so that also means the collar is too. Wear it messy and open.

From Left - Prada, Marni, Wooyoungmi, Valentino

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Name Badges

This trend followed on from London - here

Left - Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaThe Soviet Shoulder

Forget the Cold War, it's all about the cold shoulder for SS18. Think big and high. More hunched than hench!

From Left - Prada, Thom Browne,  Rick Owens, Paul Smith

Below Left - Balenciaga, Wooyoungmi, Dries van Noten

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Return of the Tie

We've seen the shirt - above - is back, so it only seems fitting that the neck tie makes a reappearance.

From Left - Marni, Marni, Kenzo, SSS World Corp

From Below - Paul Smith, Wooyoungmi, Fendi, Antonio Marras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Clashing

The less it matches the better.

Left - Marni, Sacai

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical Stripes

They make you taller & thinner? Where do I sign?!

Left - Marni, Balmain, Etudes, Haider Ackermann

Below Left - Paul Smith, Cerruti 1881, Ami

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Long Shirt

Long & loose. Just don't call it 'long-line'!

From Left - Thom Browne, Alexander McQueen, Dries van Noten, Officine Generale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

HyperFlorals

Florals on Mephedrone!

Below - Kenzo, Ami, DSquared2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Long Short Sleeves

It's all part of the larger-than-life, oversized trend of trying to make your polo shirt sleeves touch your wrists.

From Left - Balenciaga, Balenciaga, DSquared2, MSGM, Neil Barrett

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

Published in Fashion

The first ever UK exhibition on the Spanish fashion designer, Cristóbal Balenciaga, and his continuing influence on modern fashion opens at the V&A. The exhibition marks the centenary of the opening of Balenciaga’s first fashion house in San Sebastian, Spain and the 80th anniversary of the opening of his famous fashion house in Paris. 

Left - The man himself, Cristóbal Balenciaga

TheChicGeek says, “While I love the V&A’s Fashion Gallery, the big exhibition space, where Pink Floyd currently is, is usually larger and something to get more excited about. But, this exhibition feels less cramped than previous exhibitions in the space - see Underwear here - and upstairs has a nice, spacious flow.

Balenciaga, as a designer, was serious. Those black voluminous gowns seem to sum up his lack of fun. He feels strict in that Spanish Catholic way, manifesting itself in his designs using lace and the Spanish Mantilla. You don’t get much feel for the man or his personality, but I think that’s how he liked it. He only gave one interview in his life, and that was just before he died.

Left - Known for his elegant volumes, Balenciaga was one of the great couturiers of the 20th century

The name disappeared into the history books when he closed his house and only came back into common culture with its revival around 20 year's ago when Gucci’s parent company, Kering, bought it alongside Stella McCartney and Alexander McQueen.

Downstairs is a collection of pieces, mostly coats and dresses, from his most prolific period the 1960s. These are sculptural clothes for pictures and striking as they are, when they become practical, to enter the real world, particularly the commissions by the rich Americans, they look dated and frumpy. His volumes work on their own, but on people they add bulk and often swallow the wearer. These aren't easy wearing pieces.

Some of his pieces aren’t practical either. The wearer couldn’t sit down or go to the toilet in 'Envelope' dress, for example, but this doesn't detract from its beauty.

This was the golden age of 20th century of couture and while he produced ready-to-wear with his 'Eisa' range, his heart was in his exacting standards and the fine fabrics he used. 

Left - The 'Envelope' dress, 1967, a design you couldn't sit down or go to the toilet in

Balenciaga is more a collection of one-off greatest hits than themed seasons in the vain of Saint Laurent. These weren’t particularly well documented, even though they were huge, between 150 to 200 looks, as the press weren’t allowed into his shows, so the main imagery is striking black and white shoots in the magazines at the time which have entered in the common psyche of 20th century fashion images.

Upstairs is a large display with a varied selection of designers, both old and new, paying homage to the volumes that Balenciaga pioneered. There are a couple of men’s pieces by JW Anderson and Rory Parnell-Mooney to illustrate that his influence isn’t restricted solely to womenswear.

Left - JW Anderson paying homage to Balenciaga with his tulip trousers

There are a couple of pieces from the new Balenciaga, under Demna Gvasalia, who is producing great things and referencing the house while making it feel contemporary. Unfortunately, there isn't a blue Ikea bag in sight!

Balenciaga: Shaping Fashion until 18th February 2018. Admission £12

Published in Fashion
Thursday, 25 June 2015 08:43

TheChicGeek’s London SS16 Scrapbook

Lou Dalton menswear 2016 springHardy Amies spring 2016 menswearThe home of TheChicGeek and menswear, London was a four day spectacular of the creative East London meeting the more refined West. Here is TheChicGeek’s scrapbook of men's trends for #SS16:

Exterior Pockets

Designers have realised that we no longer want to be handicapped by our manbags while we still have the issue of having many additional things to carry. So, why not make a feature of your bulging pockets?

From Left - Lou Dalton, Hardy Amies 

Hardy Amies neon trend menswearTopman Design neon trendNeon

Men have become so brave, today, with colour that neon is no longer the scary super tone it used to be. More of an accent, think of it like your wardrobe highlighter.

From Left - Hardy Amies, Topman Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topman Design menswear trends SS16Agi & Sam menswear London trendsBlurred Lines

Horizontal, vertical, anyway you like. It may look a little 'Inmate Chic', but, hey, it's all about the swagger.

From Left - Topman Design, Agi & Sam

Oliver Spencer SS16 suede jacketGieves & Hawkes suede jacket SS16Summer Suede

The luxury item of SS16. This season, suede is a hybrid between a shirt and a jacket. Just make sure it's in the softest, butteriest suede in an earthy reddy brown tone.

From Left - Oliver Spencer, Gieves & Hawkes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burberry Prorsum menswear lace trendMenswear Burberry menswear SS16 trendsMace

Male lace or 'Mace' can be as dangerous as it sounds. It's probably best layered with glimpses, rather than full on out there, unless you're as a skinny as a Burberry model.

Left - Both Burberry Prorsum

Coach menswear LCM SS16 animal printsBurberry Prorsum animal prints menswearAnimal Highlights

Yabba dabba doo or don't depending on how you feel about animal prints. These should look like fun animals: the kind you'd win at the fair!

From Left - Coach, Burberry Prorsum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunhill new suit greenTopman Design new suit New Suit

I always feel Winston Churchill's boiler suit inspires these kind of bomber/Harrington type suits. The new dress down dress up for those wanting to look put together while looking young, sporty and contemporary.

From Left - Dunhill, Topman Design

Alexander McQueen menswear pyjama colour SS16Hardy Amies menswear SS16 trends pyjama collarPyjama Collar

Peter Pan, Princess or plain old PJ, the shirt colour is light, relaxed and open for the forthcoming SS16 season.

From Left - Alexander McQueen, Hardy Amies

With thanks to Smart ForFour

Published in Fashion