Men's Fragrance Review Lalique L'Insoumis Ma Force

Lalique has announced the launch of its new men's scent, L'Insoumis Ma Force. It opens with fruity lemon notes mixed with spicy cardamom and green apple. The heart features lavender balanced with violet leaf, rosemary and green camphor, rounded off with a sensual wood and amber base. The perfumer is Fabrice Pellegrin.

TheChicGeek says, “Translated as ‘rebellious’ and ‘my strength’, this is a classic fougère with the 90s note of choice - green apple. While not its main focus, Lalique fragrances are pretty good and I usually like the packaging. Often inspired by the frosted/art-deco style of his most famous glassware, the Lalique bottles are affordable nods to the super-expensive originals. This is a bit of a let down as a bottle and is not very memorable.

The fragrance enters a busy space for the lavender-based with a woody base with a lemon/green top, but, of its type, it ain’t bad. While there are a lot of these around, this certainly has the freshness, scents of this type have, without that annoying synthetic after-note - read cheap - you find with less expensive variants.”

Left - Lalique - L’Insoumis Ma Force - 100ml - £72

Thursday, 17 May 2018 14:01

Tried & Tested Paul Smith Hello You!

Men's Fragrance Review Paul Smith Hello You

For Paul Smith’s new ‘Hello You!’ fragrance, perfumers Fanny Bal and Dominique Ropion say they were inspired by Paul Smith’s celebrated use of colour. The fresh, sparkling citrus opening is followed by a very British aromatic lavender heart, blended with a fruity apple accord. The base notes underline the strong masculinity of patchouli and vetiver, magnified with the sensuality of ciste absolute.

TheChicGeek says, “I really like Paul Smith, the man and the brand. He’s probably the nicest man in fashion. But, I’ve always got the vibe that he doesn’t really know that much about fragrance and therefore has never given it his full attention. 

His past fragrances have never been that distinctive, which is strange for a man who happily paints shops fuchsia pink - LA - and Minis stripey. They were also quite young and priced too cheaply.

Men's Fragrance Review Paul Smith Hello You

Anyway, there’s a new men’s one on the block called ‘Hello You!’. A play with Paul’s famous 1940s pin-ups, usually found on the interiors of his wallets, it sticks to the classic rectangular bottle with a screw cap.

I like the name, but, it feels like the kind of packaging I wanted 15 years ago from him. It’s a shame they didn’t do a choice of male or female pin-ups, it would have felt more contemporary - I was thinking ‘Cooey’ for the male one!

The fragrance is still young and it is priced to sell, but I find I’m having less and less patience for these types of fragrance. I really want something special from Paul Smith and for him to have the same confidence with fragrance that he has with colour.”

Left & Right - Paul Smith Hello You! 100ml - £45 

Men's Fragrance Review Ermengildo Zegna Acqua Di NeroliGrown exclusively for the Zegna family, Zegna bergamot and petitgrain bigarade capture the sundrenched effervescence of the Italian seaside with a refreshing zest of lemon in Zegna’s latest men’s fragrance. Freesia and dewy leaves impart a soft fluidity to the citrus.

A classic aromatic heart of lavendin, cypress and rosemary adds cool woodiness to the invigorating spice of neroli. Violet leaves and watermelon further facet the fragrance with a green crunch and refreshing splash. The confident ease of the scent emanates from earthy woods, cypriol heart and tree moss, while musk and sandalwood offer golden warmth to ocean-sprayed seaweed for a sensation of the glistening and sun-kissed.

TheChicGeek says, “This needs to be a cologne or used like one - which means you continually reapply - as it’s all about the top. Neroli - orange blossom - is one of my favourite ingredients and this couldn’t come at a better time of year when our nostrils are open and this intoxicating blossom chimes with the season.

The bergamot and neroli go together like chicken and egg, while the other ingredients take a supporting role. This doesn’t last long, but, then it’s all about that initial hit."

Left - Ermenegildo Zegna - Acqua Di Neroli - 100ml - £82  Exclusively at John Lewis from 1st June 2018

Friday, 04 May 2018 12:22

Tried & Tested Ancestry DNA

Tried Tested Review Ancestry DNA'

Have you ever wondered where you come from? Ancestry DNA offered me the chance of reviewing their DNA testing service and finding out my geographical genetic make up.

When people used to take the piss out of me at school for having ginger hair I used to think at least I know where I come from from how I look. Imagining my ancestors to be fiery Celts or Ancient Britons, my red hair is a visible throwback to my British ancestors. Or so I thought. Would this ruin my romantic vision of myself?

The testing is really simple. Everything comes in a simple, small box and you spit saliva into a tube, up to a certain level, screw the top on to release a blue liquid into the sample, I guess to stabilise it, and then you put it into the pre-paid box and post.

It said it would take 6-8 weeks and I received regular e-mails updating me on the process and when I could expect it. I was fast-tracked because I was press and it wasn’t long before my results came through.

I was told I have quite a high percentage of Great British DNA in comparison to the average Brit. (See the chart left).

My results were 61% Great Britain - Northern England & the Midlands - this is correct as my paternal grandmother was born in Bury, Manchester. I was expecting more from the East of England as that’s where my surname is from.

38% Ireland/Scotland/Wales, particularly Ulster, Ireland, which is correct because my maternal grandmother was from Northern Ireland.

Then finally, 1% Asia South. It circles India, so it could be a connection with the British Empire, but definitely not something I know directly about.

So, ultimately, I’m 99% from the United Kingdom. I’m a fucking pedigree! I jokingly told my friends I’ll be downloading the forms for Crufts for next year. Expect sponsored posts from Pedigree Chum coming soon!

But, seriously, none of this really matters, but it’s something interesting to think about and also opens up conversations within your family.

I sent Ancestry DNA a few further questions after my results had come through.

Can consumers ask further questions or is this another cost?

There should be enough information online, but there is a support team that can help with consumer questions free of charge.

How far does it go back?

2,000 years

What’s the margin for error?

AncestryDNA uses advanced scientific techniques to produce your results. We measure and analyse a person's entire genome at over 700,000 locations. During the testing process, each DNA sample is held to a quality standard of at least a 98% call rate. Any results that don't meet that standard may require a new DNA sample to be collected.

Then we compare your DNA to one of the most comprehensive and unique collections of DNA samples from people around the world, to identify overlap. As our database of DNA samples continues to grow, you could receive updates with new information.

Is my DNA stored somewhere now?

The results of your DNA test are stored in a secured database — your AncestryDNA results are stored in a secured database, which employs a number of security measures. As well as protecting the information from unauthorised access from those outside of AncestryDNA, we strictly limit access to this database from within the company as well.

The lab processing your DNA doesn't have access to your name, address and other contact information — DNA samples are tested in a secure third-party testing lab in the United States. We separate your name from your DNA sample throughout the testing process. Instead, we use a unique Activation Code provided in your kit to track your DNA through the testing process and in storage.

Your DNA sample is securely stored — After testing is complete, any remaining DNA from your test is archived and stored in a temperature-controlled, secure facility with 24-hour monitoring and limited access.

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) — United States law (the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act or “GINA”) generally makes it illegal for health insurance companies, group health plans, and most employers to discriminate against you based on your genetic information. Learn more about GINA here.

You have the choice to delete your DNA test results — Once a DNA test result is deleted, that choice is permanent. You will no longer see the results in your account. Also, your DNA matches will no longer see your username among their list of matches. So be sure you want to delete a DNA test result before you do it, as there is no way to recover the data after it’s deleted.

If you have given your consent to participate in ongoing research efforts and you delete your DNA results, your consent will be withdrawn and your information will not be used in future research.  Please note, however, that information cannot be withdrawn from studies in progress, completed studies, or published results.

Your raw DNA data is secured by a number of security measures while in our possession. For example, your DNA sample is identified only by a bar code—even our testing laboratories don't have your identity. We also store all DNA data in encrypted databases to ensure restricted access, even within the company. These protections will remain for the copy of your raw DNA data that we possess but you will need to secure the raw DNA data if you choose to download it.

Will the ethnicity results tell what information is specific to my maternal or paternal line?

The type of DNA that is being tested looks at ethnicity across both maternal and paternal lines. It does not currently isolate ethnicity results to only your maternal or paternal line.

My results were pretty boring, but they are also believable and fit what I already know about my family. We’re still close to a time when people didn’t move around as much and these geographical areas match. 

It costs £79, and I think it would make an interesting gift for somebody who is impossible to buy for. The 6-8 week wait is quite long.

Ancestry DNA obviously want you to sign up for the additional, paid-for features on their website and for you to link into other family trees and information. While the Americans are very much into their ancestry, the British are more confident about where they come from and are less interested in proving their origins.

AncestryDNA says it can estimate your origins to more than 350 ancestral regions around the world—5x more regions than the next leading test.

I enjoyed telling my family and, being from a working class background, it’s interesting how private previous generations were with regards to their origins and also where they came from. This is the time when people's birth certificates didn’t match the name they used on a daily basis.

Somebody has already contacted me from New Zealand saying we have a genetic match on my paternal grandmother, but I’m also slightly cautious receiving e-mails from people I don’t know. 

Overall, this was efficient, fun and a correct insight. It reflects the #me culture we currently live in.

Ancestry DNA Kit - £79

Below - My results

Tried Tested Review Ancestry DNA'

Wednesday, 21 February 2018 10:33

ChicGeek Comment Sunscreen On A Plane

You should wear sunscreen protection on a plane

Forget snakes, it’s now sunscreen on a plane. I wanted to write this to get my head around what was new and fully understand it. 

New research from the Journal of American Medical Association Dermatology has determined that the harmful rays plane passengers are exposed to can put them at higher risk of skin cancer. For pilots especially, wearing sunscreen is of paramount importance. One hour at 30,000 feet could expose pilots to the same amount of UV radiation as a 20-minute tanning bed session would. And, while a passenger certainly faces less exposure than pilots it’s still important to heed the same advice – especially if you’re sitting in the window seat.

Houston dermatologist Dr. Esta Kronberg says when you're on a plane you should always wear sunscreen to protect you from dangerous rays that you probably won't even notice. "The UVB is what causes burning and you know it and you feel it and you tan and the glass blocks the UVB but the more penetrating rays are the UVA and they do more damage," said Kronberg.

“As you are much closer to the ozone layer the sun’s rays are much more harmful,” Matt Gass, a spokesperson for the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD), told Telegraph Travel.

“UVA can penetrate window glass and penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB. UVA protection in a sunscreen will help protect the skin against photo-ageing (skin ageing caused by ultraviolet rays, e.g. wrinkles caused by the sun) and potentially also skin cancer,” according to BAD.

TheChicGeek says, "This is more reason than ever to buy a moisturiser with a high SPF and to wear it all the time. To be able to take into a plane cabin it will need to be 100ml and under. Look for products with a high, broad spectrum protection for UVA and UVB.

Simply apply a marble-sized amount to your face, as well as any other exposed areas such as your neck, chest, hands, forearms, and ears at least one hour before you fly. It’s also important to re-apply the product every two hours, especially on long-haul flights and if close to the window. 

It's not often you think about reapplying sunscreen during a flight, but this is definitely something to do during a long-haul flight and to cover up the rest of your body using clothes or blankets."

Here are a few ChicGeek reviewed products containing SPF here

More ChicGeek reviewed sun protection products here

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