Tuesday, 17 April 2018 22:24

Review Antonio Lopez Sex, Fashion & Disco

Antonio Lopez Fashion Sex Disco documentary

What they’ve done with, I’m guessing, limited visual material is remarkable. Even a featured Andy Warhol art film/doc is of such bad quality it looks like the first season of Rupaul’s Drag Race. So they’ve done well to find enough contemporary film footage or pictures to fill this and keep your attention. Obviously, there are new interviews with people who were there at the time, but it’s sad and disappointing that the two main characters are no longer with us.

Left - Antonio & Jerry

I’d heard of Antonio Lopez before and was aware of his style of drawing. I knew the era he was producing in, but that was about all. I didn’t really know who he worked with and for whom.

James Crump’s documentary centres on Paris and New York between 1969 and 1973, viewed through the eyes of Antonio Lopez (1943-1987). A native of Puerto Rico and raised in The Bronx, the story centres on him and his personal and creative partner, Juan Ramos (1942-1995).

Antonio Lopez Fashion Sex Disco documentary

Being an illustrator Lopez would never have been in the public eye personally, unlike many of the designers he was copying. His illustrations were well known, but it felt like he was always at the mercy of the commission, whether that was for a magazine or fashion house.

Right - Lopez's partner, Juan Ramos

Unlike Warhol, who also started as an illustrator, Lopez didn’t push himself centre stage. Warhol knew there was money to be made in people’s narcissism and vanity. Lopez seems to stick to the safety of what he knows. Maybe there wasn't enough time, well, between all the shagging, at least!

I like how the documentary moves between New York and Paris, but I wanted more from the main disco time of the late 70s and early 80s. The disco is Paris’ Club Sept, but you don't really get a feel for the place. 

It gets wrapped up quickly at the end without the same level of detail. What was he working on? Did he fall out of fashion?

There is a brief moment when you feel like you’re watching a documentary about YSL and Karl Lagerfeld. (Love the beef between these two). These giant fashion planets pulled many different stars into their orbit and Lopez and his entourage of models and lovers were just some of them.

It was fun to see and hear from the group of female models Lopez championed - there's one who reminds me of Angie Bowie - and would have looked mega diverse even by today’s standards. The documentary is worth watching just for Jerry Hall’s arrival. Man, was that one beautiful woman. There are models and, then, there are supermodels. She’s like Botticelli’s Venus combine with a classical Greek siren with a dash of Texan Barbie. She’s captivating, especially in this where she's just starting out on her modelling career. This is where the film starts to end. It’s a shame, along with Grace Jones and Karl Lagerfeld, that she isn't interviewed for the film.

Antonio Lopez Fashion Sex Disco documentary

Lagerfeld seemed to distance himself at the end of Lopez’s career which is probably why he’s lasted so long in the fashion business. I imagine you have to be pretty cold and heartless in order to maintain your position. In the film he uses Lopez to illustrate his work at Chloe, and, being good at what he does, he knew they were the zeitgeist of the time and then when to drop them, accordingly. 

Upsetting the photographer, Bill Cunningham, who is a prominent interviewee in the film, Lagerfeld wasn’t there when Lopez was diagnosed with AIDS.

The film is definitely an extensive insight into Lopez's fashion circles of the late 60s, 70s and early 80s: who knew who, who fucked who and who made it through. There are, annoyingly, not enough recorded visuals of his process and you want to hear more from the man himself. You don’t get a feeling of how much he produced and how his magazine illustrations complemented the fashion of the time. The artworks look like a mix between 70s Art Nouveau and porn illustrations, but you can see his precocious talent.

The film, again, illustrates how much talent we lost during the AIDS crisis and also fulfils our insatiable thirst for retro glamour. We live in age where we are obsessed with looking backwards at talented and beautiful people, quenching our need for what we feel today's modern landscape is sadly lacking.

Left - One of Lopez's illustrations

See #ChicGeekComment Is ‘Peak Fashion Documentary’ Killing The Fashion Tome?

Friday, 13 April 2018 15:59

Hot List The Antiquity Slipper

Green velvet slippers Luke Edward Hall Stubbs Wootton

The velvet evening slipper, in fashion terms at least, is taking a break, but, when one this good comes along, it can’t pass you by. 

American slipper brand Stubbs & Wootton has teamed up with British illustrator & designer du jour, Luke Edward Hall. Grass green Sea Island cotton-velvet uppers with a turquoise blue grosgrain trim features Hall’s classical illustrations on the front. Putting the ionic into iconic!

Left & Below - Stubbs & Wootton - Vitruvius (LEH) Men Slipper - $600

Green velvet slippers Luke Edward Hall Stubbs Wootton

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film

A strange distraction robbery leaves a Stockholm art museum director chasing his wallet and phone while dealing with the woke environment of a contemporary art museum and his family life.

Winner of the Palme d’Or, last year, at Cannes, The Square’s most memorable scene is the disturbing man/artist playing an unpredictable ape, but I’ll let you find that out for yourself.

Left - Artist 'Julian' in a Q&A from the film The Square

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film Julian Schnabel

Anyway, on the style stakes, it’s the visiting artist, Julian, played by Dominic West, who is the sartorial inspiration in a scene set in the museum where he’s there to discuss his work. An audience member with Tourette’s syndrome makes it a surreal moment.

Right - Artist Julian Schnabel which some say was the inspiration for the character

Wearing blue pyjamas, a navy double breasted jacket and yellow lensed glasses he bears a striking resemblance to American painter and film maker, Julian Schnabel. 

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film Derek Rose

Pyjamas as daytime clothes have been a thing for a while now and it still looks good. Silk gives it an evening and exotic feel, while regular cotton makes it soft and relaxed. 

Left - Derek Rose - Men’s Classic Fit Piped Pyjamas - £95

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film

Sky blue cotton pyjamas worn out of the bedroom shows an easy confidence and the yellow lenses on the glasses adds the artistic element. It’s hip to be square!

Left - Reiss - Carlotta B Double-Breasted Blazer - £325

Below - Sunglasses - Paul Smith - £177, available at Sunglass Hut

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film

 

 

 

 

 

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film Lunetterie Generale yellow lenses sunglasses

Left - Sunglasses - Lunetterie Generale - £375

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film Vans

Left - Vans - Authentic Shoes - £47

Below - Dominic West in full 'Julian' PJ look

Pyjama style Julian Schnabel Dominic West artist The Square film

Wednesday, 11 April 2018 09:37

Hot List The Leather Denim Shirt

Leather denim shirt menswear hot list Tod's

Denim is having a bit of downtime while it decides where it wants to go after skinny. But, just because denim maybe having a rest, it doesn’t mean leather is. 

I saw this a few months ago and at first glance, it’s a classic blue denim shirt, but, on touching and closer inspection, it’s printed leather. Admittedly, that bumps the price up massively - it’s quite an investment - but who else do you know who will be wearing a leather denim shirt?

This is the ultimate in luxury casual.

Left & Below - Tod’s - Leather Shirt - £2650

Leather denim shirt menswear hot list Tod's

Thursday, 05 April 2018 10:29

Hot List Chemistry Teacher Shades

Men's sunglasses clear Gentle Monster Korea AfixThere was an American brand - Brashy Studio - who got a lot of online flak, recently, for selling safety glasses as a fashion accessory and charging $25 for the privilege. They cost £1.42 at B&Q BTW.

But, they were definitely onto something as clear frames and light lenses are the way to go this summer. I saw this pair from Korean brand Gentle Monster, who are set to open a store in London shortly, and there’s something one part chemistry teacher and one part Gucci catwalk that I love about them.

While they have that safety glasses vibe they’re far cooler than that and the lenses have full UV protection. Experiment!

Left & Below - Gentle Monster - Afix 02 - $310

Men's sunglasses clear Gentle Monster Korea Afix

More SS18 eyewear inspo? Try The Hamburglar Sunglasses here